​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​1.3 Assessment Criteria

1.3.1 Guide to Using the Criteria

This chapter provides a range of Assessment Criteria that are to be used, where relevant, in the assessment of activities that require resource consent.

Specifically:

​​​1.Controlled Activities will be assessed against the matters over which Council has reserved control. The assessment criteria are provided within section 1.3.2, with the section headings being the Matters of Control.
​2.Restricted Discretionary Activities that are restricted solely due to failed standards will be assessed against the effects resulting from an activity not complying with any relevant standard(s) in this District Plan (refer section 1.3.3. A1 of this appendix). ​

To assist with assessing the effects of the non-compliance, there may be specific criteria within section 1.3.3 of this appendix that could be of use in assessing the application.
​3.​Restricted Discretionary Activities that are restricted solely due to being listed in the chapters as a Restricted Discretionary Activity will be assessed against the specific matters of discretion which are identified against each activity in the chapter.  

The headings within section 1.3.3 relate to the Matters of Discretion. The criteria listed under each heading are to be used where relevant. Subheadings are provided under each subject matter to define zone or activity specific criteria for that subject matter, thereby enabling them to be considered or discarded depending on relevance.
​4.​Restricted Discretionary Activities that are restricted by virtue of being listed in the chapter as a Controlled Activity and also fail standards will be assessed against the relevant criteria as outlined in points 1 & 2 above.
​5.​Restricted Discretionary Activities that are restricted by virtue of being listed in the chapter as a Restricted Discretionary Activity and also fail standards will be assessed against the relevant criteria as outlined in points 2 and 3 above.
​6.​Discretionary and Non-Complying Activities may use the criteria in section 1.3.3 as a guide with specific reference to the general criteria in A2.​

1.3.2 Controlled Activities - Matters of Control 

The following section contains matters over which Council has reserved control for Controlled activities. These are referenced in other parts of the District Plan.

Note
1. Example: chapters in this District Plan may include a section titled “Controlled Activities – Matters of Control” and a table like the example below.
 
Activ​​ity
Matter of Control Reference Number
(Refer to Volume 2, Appendix 1.1)
i. Teaching and research laboratories
A. Hazardous Facilities

In this example the controlled activity is “i. Teaching and research laboratories”. The matters of control are identified by the reference “A”. These references align with the lists below. In this example “A” is associated with Hazardous Facilities with the relevant matters of control listed beneath.

A.

​Haza​​rdo​us Facilities ​ ​

 ​The extent to which the  effects on, and risks to, the health and safety of people, property and the environment are appropriately managed, including: ​ ​
 i.Matters referred to in the relevant standards in Rule 25.4.4 of Chapter 25.4 City-wide – Hazardous Facilities. ​
 ii.Safe access to and from the transport network. ​
 iii.Effects due to the sensitivity of the surrounding natural, human and physical environment. ​
 iv.Separation distances and the type of environment/number of people potentially at risk from the proposed facility. ​
 v.Potential hazards and exposure pathways arising from the proposed facility. ​
 vi.Potential cumulative hazards presented in conjunction with neighbouring facilities. ​
 vii.Proposed: ​
 
•  Fire safety and fire water management
   ​•  Spill contingency and emergency planning
   ​•  Monitoring and maintenance schedules
   ​•  Waste disposal management
   ​•  Hazardous substance transport arrangements.​
 viii.Compliance with relevant Standards and Codes of Practice. ​
 ix.Any other measures to avoid or mitigate risks posed by the activity. ​
 ​​Note
Relevant Standards and Codes of practice referred to above may include:
  • Below Ground Stationary Container Systems for Petroleum – Design and Installation HSNOCOP 44, Environmental Protection Agency, May 2012
  • Below Ground Stationary Container Systems for Petroleum – Operation HSNOCOP 45, Environmental Protection Agency, May 2012
  • Guidelines for Assessing and Managing Petroleum Hydrocarbon Contaminated Sites in New Zealand, Ministry for the Environment, 1999
  • Environmental Guidelines for Water Discharges from Petroleum Industry Sites in New Zealand, Ministry for the Environment, 1998
  • NZS8409: 2004 Management of Agrichemicals
  • AS/NZS 1596: 2008 – Storage and Handling of Liquid Petroleum Gas
  • AS/NZS 2982: 2010 – Laboratory Design and Construction
  • AS/NZS 2243.1: 2005 – Safety in Laboratories – Planning and Operational Aspects
  • AS/NZS 2243.2: 2006 – Safety in Laboratories – Chemical Aspects
  • AS/NZS 2243.3: 2010 – Safety in Laboratories – Microbiology
  • AS/NZS 2243.5: 2004 – Safety in Laboratories – Non-ionising Radiation
  • AS/NZS 2243.6: 2010 – Safety in Laboratories – Plant and Equipment Aspects
  • AS/NZS 2243.8: 2006 – Safety in Laboratories – Fume Cupboards
  • AS/NZS 2243.9: 2009 – Safety in Laboratories – Recirculating Fume Cabinets
  • AS/NZS 2243.10: 2004 – Safety in Laboratories – Storage of Chemicals​

​B​​​. 

​​Indust​rial Zone​​

a)​Building Design, External Appearance and Site Layout ​ ​
 i.The extent to which any activity involving buildings adjoining an identified transport corridor and buildings within the Rotokauri Employment Area presents an attractive visual appearance, including minimising: ​​
  •  Large featureless building façades facing the transport corridor.
  •  The placement of any plant or machinery on the front of the building or within the front yard setback (with the exception of machinery displayed for sale, hire, or plant associated with on-site security).
  •  Over-dominant illuminated signage within the site.
  •  Front fences, walls and signs that detract from an active visual relationship between the site and street/primary transport corridor.
  •  The location of the service and outdoor storage areas within the front setback.
 ii.For ancillary residential activities, the extent to which: ​
  •  Outdoor living areas or balconies are contiguous with the internal living areas.​
​•  The design, size and location of the private and/or communal open space, parking, loading spaces and driveways on the site achieves a high standard of amenity, noise and visual privacy for residents, whilst effect from dust, fumes and light glare are minimised.
b)​Site Layout ​ ​
 iii.Within the Rotokauri Employment Area, the extent to which the adverse effects of the location of buildings, parking areas and outside storage areas minimise their potential impact on the amenity of any adjoining Residential, Special Character or Open Space Zones. ​
 iv.For ancillary residential activities and within the Rotokauri Employment Area, the extent to which the development has been designed and located so that the potential for reverse sensitivity effects (including noise) is avoided, remedied or mitigated. ​
 v.The extent to which the site layout incorporates Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design, to develop a positive relationship with the street and improve passive surveillance. ​
 vi.
The extent to which landscaping is incorporated within the site layout, to visually reduce the bulk of new development and mitigate adverse visual effects, particularly from the front boundary and those parts of the site visible from public spaces.

Note
This is particularly important in relation to the setback from the front boundary and those parts of the site visible from public spaces and interfaces along state highways and arterial transport corridors.
​vii.​Within the Rotokauri Employment Area, the extent to which landscaping enhances amenity at key interfaces such as State Highway 1, green corridors, arterial transport corridors, Wintec Rotokauri Campus and the Rotokauri Suburban Centre. ​

C​.

​Knowledge Zone and Major ​​Facilities Zone ​ ​

a)​Building Design, External Appearance and Configuration ​ ​
 i.The extent to which the external appearance, scale and design of buildings: ​
  1.​Contributes to compatibility between buildings and their integration with other development on the site, adjacent sites and surrounding public spaces.
  2.Contributes to the active frontage along public streets and open space, particularly at corner sites.
  3.Minimises, as practicable, effects on adjacent public spaces (including footpaths) in terms of shading and daylight.
 ii.The cumulative effect of buildings and the extent to which opportunities have been taken to cluster buildings and/or ensure that areas are left free from buildings. ​
 iii.The extent to which parking, manoeuvring areas, driveways and outdoor service areas are designed and located to be safe and efficient, and to protect amenity values of the streetscape and adjoining sites. ​
 iv.The extent to which  the building design and development: ​
  1.Makes a positive contribution to the local character of the site and surrounding area.
  2.Improves large façades (including side walls) that are visible from public places by ensuring they are treated in a way that provides visual interest and reduces the apparent bulk of the building.
 v.The extent to which Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design principles have been incorporated. ​
 vi.Encourage easy and safe pedestrian access and circulation for those not arriving by vehicle. ​
b)​Landscaping ​ ​
 vii.
The extent to which landscaping is incorporated within the site layout to reduce the bulk of new development and mitigates adverse visual effects.

 
Note
This is particularly important in relation to setback from the front boundary and those parts of the site visible from public spaces and interfaces along state highways, arterial transport corridors and City gateways.
​​In addition to the above general matters, the following relate to site specific matters of control. ​ ​ ​
 ​University of Waikato ​ ​
 viii.The extent to which existing linkages between land uses are reinforced by the layout of buildings and transport corridors. New connections created should seek to enhance accessibility through the zone and have regard to connectivity to the adjoining University of Waikato campus. ​
 ix.The extent to which high rise buildings are concentrated on the Hillcrest Road ridge. ​
 x.The extent to which the location of buildings maintains the safe and efficient operation of network utilities, including high voltage transmission lines. ​
 ​Knowledge Zone ​ ​
 xi.The extent to which the open space character of the northwest sector of the site is maintained. ​
 ​Claudelands Event Centre ​ ​
 xii.The extent to which the open space character of the eastern part of the site is maintained including the maintenance of a suitable buffer adjoining Jubilee Park. ​
 ​Te Rapa Racecourse/Thoroughbred Business Park ​ ​
 xiii.The extent to which development of the site retains views between the racecourse and Minogue Park. ​
 Waikato​ Hospital ​ ​
 xiv.The extent to which activities of an industrial nature and the heliport are grouped in the south-western sector of the site. ​
 xv.The extent to which high rise buildings are concentrated towards the centre of the hospital complex. ​
 ​Waikato Stadium and Seddon Park ​ ​
 xvi.The extent to which future buildings and the enhancement of facilities including any provision for office, retail and visitor accommodation provides for functional integration with the site. ​
 ​Wintec Rotokauri ​ ​
 xvii.The extent to which development of the site has regard to the future development of the Rotokauri Area and the relationship of the site with Lake Waiwhakareke. ​

D.

​Te Rapa North Industrial Zone ​ ​

a)​Concept Development Consent for Stage 1A ​ ​
 i.The extent to which it identifies the total area not exceeding 30ha available for industrial development within Stage 1A. ​
 ii.The extent to which it defines the location and extent of the development area not exceeding 7ha pursuant to Rule 12.6.1. ​
 iii.The extent to which it defines the general location and extent of the development area not exceeding 23ha pursuant to Rule 12.6.1. ​
 iv.The extent to which it demonstrates connectivity and sequential development between the 7ha and 23ha land release areas and adjacent sites. ​
 v.The extent to which it provides an indicative internal road layout and it provides for alternative modes of transport including public transport, pedestrian and cycle linkages within and between the 30ha and adjacent land. ​
 vi.The extent to which it considers and responds to the recommendations and proposed conditions of an Integrated Transport Assessment prepared in accordance with Rule 25.14.4.3. ​
 vii.The extent to which it specifies methods by which vehicle movements will be managed to achieve compliance with Rule 12.4.7b). ​
 viii.The extent to which it identifies any existing indigenous vegetation and areas of ecological value including recognition of existing gully systems and proposals for their management. ​
 ix.The extent to which it provides for any landscaping and screen planting including landscaping buffers where land adjoins the Waikato Expressway designation boundary. ​
 x.The extent to which it provides a report which demonstrates the extent to which the provision of reticulated infrastructure for the entire 30ha within the Stage 1A development area will occur; provided that existing infrastructure available from the Te Rapa Dairy Factory and/or Council infrastructure and headworks (water and wastewater only) may be relied on for the 7ha development under Rule 12.3.3f). ​
  
Note
The above does not involve:
•  Activities requiring an air discharge consent under the Regional Plan (except on land situated to the north of Hutchinson Road, east of Te Rapa Road)
•  Hazardous waste reprocessing, disposal or storage, except for temporary storage of waste from commercial activities awaiting collection
•  An extractive industry
•  Offices, except those that are ancillary to industrial uses
•  Hospitals, day care facilities, and educational institutions
•  Retail activities, except for food outlets less than 200m2
•  Residential activities unless associated with a lawfully established activity.
b)​Concept Development Consent for Stage 1B ​ ​
 i.The extent to which it identifies the total area not exceeding 30ha available for industrial development within Stage 1B. ​

ii.The extent to which it defines the location and extent of the development area not exceeding 7ha pursuant to Rule 12.6.1. ​

iii.The extent to which it defines the general location and extent of the development area not exceeding 23ha pursuant to Rule 12.6.1. ​

iv.The extent to which it demonstrates connectivity and sequential development between the 7ha and 23ha land release areas and adjacent sites. ​

v.The extent to which it provides an indicative internal road layout and it provides for alternative modes of transport including public transport, pedestrian and cycle linkages within and between the 30ha and adjacent land. ​

vi.The extent to which it demonstrates how the provision of infrastructure will occur for the area not exceeding 7ha under Rule 12.3.3h) (how wastewater will be managed prior to disposal at the Hamilton Waste Treatment Plant; and how water supply will not adversely affect Hamilton City's water quality rating); or how wastewater and water supply will be managed using Council's reticulated infrastructure. ​

vii.The extent to which  it demonstrates how the provision of reticulated infrastructure for the entire 30ha within the Stage 1B development area will occur using council infrastructure and headworks (water and wastewater only) when development occurs beyond the 7ha service centre. ​

viii.The extent to which it identifies any existing indigenous vegetation and areas of ecological value including recognition of existing gully systems and proposals for their management. ​

ix.The extent to which it considers and responds to the recommendations and proposed conditions of an Integrated Transport Assessment prepared in accordance with Rule 25.14.4.3. ​

x.The extent to which it identifies methods by which vehicle movements will be managed to achieve compliance with Rule 12.4.7c). ​

xi.The extent to which it provides for landscaping and screen planting including landscaping buffers where land adjoins the Waikato Expressway designation boundary.  ​

 
Note
The above does not involve:
•  Hazardous waste reprocessing, disposal or storage, except for temporary storage of waste from commercial activities awaiting collection
•  Any extractive industry
•  Offices, except those that are ancillary to industrial uses
•  Hospitals, day care facilities, and educational institutions
•  Retail activities, except for food outlets established in association with the service centre
•  Residential activities unless associated with a lawfully established activity.

E.

Historic Heritage​

a)Management of effects on, and risks to the heritage value of the historic heritage building or structure, including: ​ ​
 i.Effects to the exterior of the historic heritage building or structure.
​ii.​Potential loss of the heritage values of the building or structure.
​iii.​Any other measures to avoid or mitigate risks proposed by the activity.
​iv.​Works compatible with and reflect the original fabric of the historic heritage building or structure.
​v.​Earthquake strengthening not detracting from the appearance and integrity of the historic heritage building or structure.
​vi.​Demonstration of the conservation principles of the International Council on Monuments and Sites (ICOMOS) New Zealand.​

F.

​​​Ruakura

a)Interface Design Control Area
Landscaping

i.Ruakura Logistics Zone - Subject to biosecurity requirements, landscaping should be incorporated within the site layout to reduce the bulk of new development and mitigate adverse visual effects. This is particularly important in relation to setbacks from the front boundary and those parts of the site visible from public spaces and interfaces along state highways, arterial transport corridors, and the Ruakura Open Space Zone and City gateways.
ii.In relation to the Waikato Expressway, whether landscaping along the boundary with the Expressway Designation is of appropriate scale and density so as to soften views from the Expressway of industrial development.
iii.Ruakura Industrial Park Zone – Landscaping and screening should be incorporated within the site layout to reduce the bulk of new buildings and associated development, and to mitigate adverse visual effects - particularly from storage, loading and operational areas likely to be visible from residential areas. This is also important in relation to setbacks from the front boundary and those parts of the site visible from public spaces and interfaces along state highways, arterial transport corridors, and the Ruakura Open Space Zone and city gateways. 
iv.Ruakura Industrial Park Zone – In relation to buildings and associated development on sites that adjoin the Ruakura Open Space Zone and abutting the northern boundary of properties on Sheridan Street and Nevada Road or are adjacent to Silverdale Road, proposed landscaping and screening is subject to specific assessment and the standards in Rule 25.5.3.1 are to be used as a guide only.
b)Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design​
i.Buildings and the site layout shall be designed to:
a)Provide surveillance from offices over main access, car parks and the adjacent street.
b)Ensure a clear distinction between visitor areas and operational areas.
c)Provide direct, legible and well lit visitor routes.
d)Avoid opportunities for concealment.
c)Temporary Logistics Activities in Sub Area A ​​
i.Conditions shall be imposed to ensure that the location of buildings associated with logistics is temporary, the future rail spur corridor is not compromised and that buildings and activities do not preclude the future full development of the Inland Port.
d)Medium Density Residential Zone​​
i.Impact of building design, external appearance and configuration on the public realm particularly when viewed from the Ruakura Open Space Zone and arterial corridor. 
ii.​Site layout.
iii.​Landscaping.
​iv.
The extent to which the amenity and safety of future occupiers will be protected.

1.3.3 Restricted Discretionary, Discretionary and Non-Complying  Assessment Criteria

​The following section contains assessment criteria under subject headings that relate to the 'Matters of Discretion' for Restricted Discretionary activities. These are referenced in other parts of the District Plan.

Note
Example:  C​​hapters in this District Plan may include a section titled “Restricted Discretionary Activity – Matters for Discretion, Assessment Criteria and Non-Notification Rule” and a table like the example below.

Activity S​​pecific
Matter of Discretion and Assessment Criteria Reference Number
(Refer to Volume 2, Appendix 1.2)
i.    Vegetation clearance
D - Natural character and open space

In this example the restricted discretionary activity is “i. Vegetation clearance”. The matters to which discretion has been restricted to are identified by the subject heading of  “D - Natural character and open space”. 

A range of criteria are provided under that heading in this section and where these criteria are relevant they can be used to assess the application. All criteria under the identified subject heading do not need to be assessed, only those relevant to the application.

Discretionary and Non-Complying Activities may use the criteria in this section as a guide, with specific reference to the general criteria in A2.​

​A

General Criteria
​Restricted Discretionary Activities due to Performance Standard Non-Compliance

A1​The effects resulting from an activity not complying with any relevant standard(s) in this District Plan. Guidance on the assessment of effects may be derived from: 
 a)Any relevant criteria within section 1.3.3 of this appendix; and
​b)​Any relevant design guidelines contained within this Plan.
​A2The extent to which any adverse effects would be offset by benefits to the community or the natural environment.​
​ ​Discretionary & Non-Complying Activities - General Criteria​
​A3Without restricting the exercise of its discretion to grant or refuse consent or impose conditions, the Coun​cil shall have regard to the assessment criteria set out below when considering any application under sections 104 and 104B of the Act. Discretionary activities and Non-Complying activities shall be assessed against, but not limited to the following assessment criteria:​
​a)Assessment against relevant objectives and policies including Chapter 2 Strategic Framework
​b)​The extent to which the proposal is consistent with relevant:
​i.​Standards in this Plan.
​ii.​Assessment Criteria, listed in this plan.
​iii.​Design Guides.
​iv.​Structure Plans.
​v.​Comprehensive Development Consents.
​vi.​Concept Plans or Concept Development Consent​s.
​vii.​Reserve Management Plans.
​viii.​Iwi or Hapu Management Plans.
​ix.​Waikato River Vision and Strategy.
​x.​Master Plans.​
​xi​​Temple VIew Precincts

​B

​D​esign and Layout

​General
​B1​Whether the proposed building design and / or site layout is consistent with the intent of any relevant design guide in Appendix 1 Section 1.4.
Note
If an activity is a Restricted Discretionary Activity in relation to Design and Layout matters and there is a relevant design guide, then the activity should seek to address the outcomes sought in the design guide as a priority over relevant criteria in th is section.
Where an application is for a Concept Plan Consent in the Knowledge Zone, the Design and Layout assessment criteria will focus on building precincts / sub-areas, development and infrastructure layout rather than individual buildings.
​B2​Whether the external appearance, scale and design of buildings and structures:

​a)Are consistent with the purpose of the zone, and enhance the character and amenity of the surrounding area, streetscape qualities and adjoining land uses.​
​b)​For corner sites, where appropriate, provide active frontages along both elevations.
​c)​Incorporate Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design principles.
​B3​The extent to which the proposed design provides or continues to provide for informal surveillance of public spaces within and adjacent to the development by:​
​a)Locating doors, windows and other openings associated with living and working areas, so that they overlook and interact with public spaces.​
​b)​Locating primary entrances to buildings to face the transport corridor frontage, with the main entrance located adjacent to the frontage with the most pedestrian traffic.
​B4The extent to which building design will add visual interest and vitality to the streetscape and avoids large, featureless façades. For example, through articulation of a façade, attention to fenestration and rooflines, the design of verandas and balconies and the careful choice of materials and colour.​
​B5​The extent to which parking, manoeuvring areas, driveways and outdoor service areas have been designed and located:​
​a)To protect amenity values of the streetscape and adjoining sites, including through the use of appropriate screening and landscaping.​
​b)​To not be visually dominant.
​c)​To be away from the front of the site and buildings.
​d)​To integrate with adjacent activities and development in terms of the provision of entrances, publicly accessible spaces, verandas, parking, loading areas, access to public transport and pedestrian linkages.
​B6The extent to which the activity, including landscaping, has been designed in a manner that supports and enhances pedestrian and cyclists movements, including access to the transport network and along frontages considered important for shopping or entertainment activities.​
Landscaping and Screening
​B7​The extent to which planting and landscaping is used to:
​a)Establish and maintain a well vegetated environment that is compatible with the zone and existing character.​
​b)​Visually reduce the bulk of new development and mitigate adverse visual effects particularly from the front boundary and those parts of the site visible from public spaces.
​c)​Create an attractive environment that maintains safety and amenity for pedestrians.
Waste Management​
​B8​​The extent to which developments provide for goods handling, storage, waste and recycling areas that are:​
​a)Easily accessible for collection agencies and avoid adverse visual, noise or odour effects.​
​b)​Consistent with the amenity values of the site and avoid causing nuisance for neighbouring residential activities.
​c)​Suitable for the demand expected by the activity.
Business Zones​
​B9​Whether the proposed building setback adversely affects the use and safety of public spaces, or the continuity of shopping frontages.
​B10​Whether development of a site adjoining the riverbank encourages pedestrian access to and facilitates public use and enjoyment of, the promenade and environs of the Waikato River.
​B11​In relation to the setbacks from internal boundaries at upper levels (i.e. fourth level and above), the extent to which the proposal minimises shadowing and loss of natural light on existing adjacent buildings by providing adequate separation between the proposed development and any existing residential development. 

Knowledge Zone
​B12​The extent to which public spaces and streets have been designed to be accessible and open to the public at all times (except where closed for operational safety or security reasons).
University of Waikato
​B13​The extent to which existing linkages between land uses are reinforced by the layout of buildings and transport corridors. New connections created should enhance accessibility through the zone and have regard to connectivity to the adjoining University of Waikato campus.
​B14​The extent to which high rise buildings are concentrated on the Hillcrest Road ridge.
​B15​The extent to which the open space character of the northwest sector of the site is maintained.​
Sites Adjoining the Waikato Riverbank
​B16​The extent to which development of a site adjoining the riverbank:
​a)​Provides a scale and design of any building or structure that maintains or enhances street and reserve areas, the character and amenity, and the heritage or open space values of the adjoining riverbank area.
​b)​Makes provision for building design and configuration, site layout and/or landscaping which enhances the visual and physical relationship with the Waikato River. 
​c)​Mitigates the impact of large developments and vehicular oriented activities on the amenity values of the riverbank environment.
Development within a Structure Plan Area​
​B17​The extent to which the proposal is consistent with any relevant objectives of any structure plan or could prejudice or foreclose options for future urban development and in particular with the proposals shown on the relevant Structure Plan for the area.
​B18​The extent to which the proposed transport network promotes opportunities to achieve:
​a)​A legible and logical pattern of development in accordance with the planned transport network identified within the relevant structure plan or the ability to extend existing transport networks, and
​b)​The future transport network within the relevant structure plan area for which more precise design, location and layout has been approved.
​B19The extent to which the proposal takes into account new information or policies (including but not limited to ICMPs) that will result in outcomes that are more beneficial than those shown on the Structure Plan.​
Dairies in General Residential and Special Character Zones
​B20​The extent to which the site can adequately accommodate the dairy, any associated residential activity, parking, planting, service areas and signage, whilst ensuring that the building would not dominate the streetscape.​

​C

​Character and Amenity​

​General
​C1​The extent to which the activity:
​a)Makes adequate provision to protect the visual and acoustic privacy of abutting residential and community uses, including through building and site design and hours of operation.​
​b)​Is compatible with the location in terms of maintaining and enhancing the character and amenity of the surrounding streetscape and urban form.
​c)​Is able to avoid, remedy or mitigate adverse effects on the existing and foreseeable future amenity of the area, particularly in relation to noise, traffic generation, material deposited on roads, dust, odour and lighting.
Reverse Sensitivity​
​C2​The extent to which the development (including residential development) has been designed and located so that the potential for reverse sensitivity effects (including noise) are avoided, remedied or mitigated.
Residential Zone
​C3​The extent to which the cumulative effects of a non-residential activity together with other non-residential activities will result in an adverse effect to the residential character of the neighbourhood.
Central City & Business Zones
​C4​The extent to which the level of non-retail activity within a shopping frontage would adversely affect the attraction of shoppers and visitors.​
Future Urban Zone
​C5​The extent to which the location and siting of effluent storage and disposal can avoid effects to dwellings or adjoining sites.
​C6​The extent to which the rural activity remains the predominant activity on the site.
​C7​The extent to which any intensive farming activity avoids adverse effects of noise, odour, vermin and other potential health hazards or mitigates  these through  management practices, site layout (placement and orientation), design of buildings, screening and landscaping.
​C8​The measures to be adopted to avoid, remedy or mitigate potential effects on residential activities on the site and adjoining properties.
Non-Industrial Activities in the Industrial Zone
​C9​The extent to which the non-industrial activity, within an Industrial Zone, serves the needs of an industrial area and adjoining areas, or is more appropriate to an industrial location than in other areas having regard to the nature of the activity, travel demand characteristics and amenity expectations.

Residential activities in Figure 9.3.a
​C10​​For managed care facilities, retirement villages, and rest homes, the extent to which:
​a)The siting, scale, design and layout of buildings​ ensures compatibility between buildings and their integration with other sensitive development on the site, adjacent sites and surrounding public spaces such as Ashurst Park.
​b)​The design, size and location of the private and/or communal open space, parking, loading spaces and driveways on the site achieves a high standard of on-​site amenity, noise and visual privacy for residents, and ensures that effects from dust, fumes and light glare are minimised.
​c)​Outdoor living areas or balconies are contiguous with the internal living areas.
​d)​The location of buildings, window and door placement, parking areas and outside amenity areas avoid reverse sensitivity effects on any adjoining industrial activities.
e)​Existing linkages between land uses are reinforced by the layout of buildings and their positive interface with the proposed linkage road between Maui Street and Karewa Place.
Subdivision 
​C11​The extent to which the proposal is consistent with any relevant design guidance in Appendix 1 Section 1.4.
​C12​The extent to which any boundary adjustment would have potential adverse effects on the site or the surrounding area.
​C13​Whether the subdivision creates lots that are appropriate for their intended use.
​C14​The extent to which subdivision or subsequent building design, including the location of transport corridors and reserves, provides for existing electricity lines and their corridors. 
​C15​The extent to which the proposal is consistent with objectives of any relevant structure plan or could prejudice or foreclose options for future urban development and in particular with the proposals shown on the relevant Structure Plan for the area.
​C16​The extent to which the proposal (including the proposed transport network) promotes opportunities to achieve:
​a)​A legible and logical pattern of development in accordance with the planned transport network identified within the relevant structure plan or the ability to extend existing transport networks, and
b)​​The future transport network within the relevant structure plan area for which more precise design, location and layout has been approved.
​C17​ ​Ancillary retailing and offices in the Industrial Zone
In assessing the suitability for ancillary retail or office activity to expand over the thresholds denoted in the Plan, regard shall be given to the following:​ ​
​a)​Whether the ancillary use is integral to the continuing operation of the principal activity on the site.
​b)​Whether the ancillary use remains incidental and subordinate to the principal activity on the site.
​c)​Whether the principal activity continues to be of an industrial character and nature.

​D

Natural Character and Open Space​

​General
​D1​The extent to which buildings, earthworks, developments and site layout and clustering:
​a)​Complements and retains the underlying landform and the legibility of the ridgeline features including views to and from ridgelines, having regard to both immediate and cumulative effects.
​b)​Provides a sufficient area of open space to enable a sense of the underlying landform to be retained.
​c)​Retains and incorporates natural features and established mature and indigenous vegetation into the design.
​D2The extent to which the site for a proposed building or structure integrates with the site features of the open space.​
Activities Affecting Scheduled Trees or a Significant Natural Area
​D3The extent to which activities associated with the proposal will:
​a)Adversely affect any identified value of the tree.​
​b)​Adversely affect the health of the tree.
​c)​Adversely affect any identified value of the Significant Natural Area.
​d)​Adversely affect the health of the Significant Natural Area.
​e)​Cause the loss of habitat that provides a key life-cycle function or the physical disturbance of indigenous species listed as ‘threatened’ or ‘at risk’ in the New Zealand Threat Classification Systems Lists. 
​D4The extent to which impermeable surfaces adversely affect water quality, and the surrounding watertable.​
​D5​The extent to which vegetation removal adversely affects the natural character or landscape value of any lake or wetland and the ability to offset such effects through restoration or enhancement.
​D6​The extent to which any earthworks will adversely affect the surrounding water table and water quality and the opportunity to mitigate the loss of water from the site.
​D7​The extent to which earthworks exacerbate or contribute to flooding, both on-site and off-site.
​D8​Whether the removal of peat soils can be mitigated to protect the surrounding water table.
​D9​Where it is clearly impractical to dispose of stormwater to ground the provision of other mitigation measures to maintain the water table and protect water quality.
​D10​The extent to which undertaking the activity will enable replacement or enhancement of existing vegetation, natural values, or the improvement of riparian margins.​
Non-emergency Works to, Removal or Transplanting of, a Scheduled Tree 
​D11​The extent to which the tree is causing serious damage to structures or the tree constitutes a hazard to human health, property and infrastructure.
​D12​Whether the tree’s chance of survival, in the case of transplanting, is better than in its existing location.
​D13​Whether alternative developments avoiding the need to remove the tree(s) have been adequately considered.
Surface of Water
​D14​The extent to which water flows are impeded and the potential for debris to be snagged.
​D15​The extent of the effect of the proposal on:
​a)Natural character, ecological values, riparian habitat, recreational values, landscape quality and amenity values of the waterway.​
​b)​Public access to the waterway and on the surface of water.
​c)​Adjacent scheduled historic buildings, structures and sites, significant natural areas and significant trees.
​d)​Land-based activities.
​e)​Other users of the water body including recreational and other commercial activities. 
​f)​Health and safety and effects on navigation. 
​g)​Stirring sediment, transporting weeds and aquatic pests.
​h)​Bank erosion.
​D16The extent to which the effects of flow levels of the river have been taken into account. (Events should not take place when the Waikato River is in flood, or in low-flow condition.)​
​D17​The extent to which the design of a pontoon, jetty or boat ramp allows for the operation of the Waikato Hydro System between the lower and upper operating levels for the System.
Esplanade Reserves and Strips
​D18​Any reduction in the required width of esplanade reserve or strip may be considered where:
​a)​Topography or the location of an existing building dictates a practical boundary less than 20m.​
​b)​Reduction of part is offset with a compensatory increased width elsewhere.
Note
For any stream, the purpose of the reserve can be met by a lesser width but should not be considered less than 4m.
And, whether the varied width of the esplanade reserve or strip is such that:​
​c)​There is adequate public access to any river, lake or stream and their margins to enable the public to meet any social, recreational or cultural needs.
​d)​The natural habitats of flora and fauna in, on or surrounding the river, lake or stream are not adversely affected.
​e)​Any Significant Historic Heritage sites identified in Schedule 8A or 8B of Appendix 8 are protected from encroaching development.
​f)​Any adverse impacts on water quality are adequately and efficiently mitigated.
​D19In assessing whether an esplanade strip should be set aside, the Council will consider:​
​a)​Whether there is a need to retain public access because the opportunity to acquire an esplanade reserve is unlikely to arise.
​b)​Whether public benefits can be achieved.
​D20​ ​The banks of any river, lake or stream can be adequately and efficiently maintained.​

​E

​Heritage Values and Special Character​

​General
​E1​The extent to which the proposal, development, excavation or subdivision of a historic heritage site or place:
​a)​Is consistent with the identified heritage values, including scale, design, form, style, bulk, height, materials and colour, and retains, protects or enhances the historic context.
​b)​Provides for design, layout or location of the activity, including associated building platforms, vehicle access and services on site in a manner that will minimise the disturbance of the site.
​c)​​Provides for the on-going maintenance of the site to ensure that the site is preserved and that damage does not occur.
​d)​In Schedule 8A of Appendix 8 maintains visual linkages between the building or structure and the street.
​e)​Is compatible with the reasons for inclusion of the building, structure or site and its significance in Schedules 8A or 8B, of Appendix 8.
​f)​Addresses cumulative effects on heritage values.
​g)​Considers the irreversibility of an effect (e.g. the loss of unique features)
​h)​Considers the opportunities for remediation and the costs and technical feasibility of remediation.
​i)​Considers the resilience of the heritage feature to change (e.g. the ability of the feature to assimilate change, or the vulnerability of the feature to change).
​j)​Adheres to the conservation principles of International Council on Monuments and Sites (ICOMOS) New Zealand Charter (2010) for the Conservation of Places of Cultural Heritage Value, where applicable. 
​k)​Includes consultation with Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga.
​l)​In the event of relocation, has adequately considered whether the relocation is necessary and whether appropriate measures are proposed to ensure any potential adverse effects on heritage values are avoided, remedied or mitigated.
​m)​Incorporates proposed planting, fencing and identification (e.g. signage) sufficient to ensure site recognition.​
​​E2T​he extent to which the heritage values of any buildings or places identified in Schedules 8A or 8B of Appendix 8 would be adversely affected by the proposal.
​E3The extent to which  the proposal including modification, re-use, renovation or restoration to the building or structure:
a)​ ​Contributes positively to the character of the surrounding area and maintains the relationship of the building or structure with its setting.​
​b)​Will maintain and enhance environmental, social, or cultural effects for the wider community.
​c)​Considers the extent to which the primary façade of a scheduled building is proposed to be altered, and whether the main determinants of the style and character, and the heritage significance, of the building are maintained or restored.
​d)​Ensures new buildings respect the design, scale and materials of any original façade.
​E4The extent to which it is practicable to provide noise insulation to the required standard without compromising the heritage significance and fabric of the building.​
​E5​The extent to which the addition of an awning would likely detract from the original character of an identified heritage buildings in Schedule 8A and 8B of Appendix 8.
Temple View Heritage Area
​E6​The extent to which new development or earthworks (including the planting or removal of vegetation and trees) would adversely affect the landscape setting and views of the Temple from Tuhikaramea Road.
​E7​The extent to which works to a transport corridor or parking area continue the consistent use of materials and kerb edging used throughout the Heritage Area.
​E8​The extent to which provision has been made for the investigation, recording or preservation of any archaeological deposits or features.
Temple View Character Area
​E9​The extent to which development maintains the characteristic setback of buildings from the transport corridor, visibility between the dwelling and the transport corridor and high levels of landscaping and permeable surfaces within the front building setback.
​E10​The extent to which the proposed development, building, structure, alteration or addition is compatible with the scale, form, style, bulk, height, colour or materials of surrounding buildings or structures within the Temple View Character Area.
​E11​Whether removal of any building or structure within the Character Area Precinct 1, 2 and 4 will affect the gateway appearance of the Temple View Character Area.
​E12​The extent to which the generous spacing between single dwellings is maintained.
​E13​Whether it has been clearly demonstrated that demolition of any heritage building in Schedule 8A of Appendix 8 is necessary, considering alternatives for the refurbishment or re-use of the building, financial cost and technical feasibility.
​E14​Any immediate or cumulative effects of the loss, alteration or removal of any buildings on the overall coherence of the Temple View Character Area.
​E15​The extent to which new development or earthworks would adversely affect the landscape setting and views of the Temple View Character Area.
​E16​The extent to which the development would adversely affect the spatial relationship between the curtilage wall and Tuhikaramea Road, and the consistency of design of the privacy walling separating the covered walkways from Tuhikaramea Road.
​E17​The extent to which new development maintains a coherent character within the Temple View Character Area  and, where relevant, integrates with development within the subject Precinct, and any adjacent Precinct any Comprehensive Development Consent.

Peacocke Special Character Zone
​E18​The extent to which provision for effluent and stormwater disposal mitigates any risk of landslip or erosion and avoids adverse effects on water quality as it relates to ground water, the Waikato River, and the Mangakotukutuku gully ecosystem.
​E19​The extent to which the proposed development takes into account existing rural activities, the location of existing use building platforms and the proposed arterial transport corridors as shown on the Peacocke structure Plan.
​E20​Whether the placement of buildings would facilitate future urban re-subdivision particularly with regards to achieving a cohesive urban layout anticipated by the Peacocke Structure Plan and does not compromise the economic provision of future infrastructure.
​E21​The extent to which the development provides for the avoidance of natural hazards.
​E22​The extent to which a development could have an adverse effect on the consistency and amenity of the area or the presence of mature vegetation.
​E23​Any positive impacts to the neighbourhood or the wider community, including the extent to which the activity might enhance the amenity of the area.
​E24​Any cumulative effects from the activity, whether on its own or in combination with other activities in the area.
​E25​The extent to which the proposed development is compatible with the intent of the consented Master Plan.​
Rototuna North East Character Zone
​E26​The extent to which any proposed development or building is consistent with the development controls for the Rototuna North East Character Zone and responds to the existing landform, including the extent to which it avoids excessive earthworks including significant cutting and filling, and does not adversely affect the natural topography, the construction or operation of the Waikato Expressway (Designation E90) or Council infrastructure.
​E27​The extent to which the development is compatible with the landform and size of the site, having regard to the intended open space and character of the area.
​E28​The relationship between the scale of any buildings on the site and existing residential development, having regard to the intended character of the area.
​E29​The extent to which the subdivision creates a block pattern with lots fronting streets and backing onto the rear of other lots, addressing the natural landform of the area and on the steeper land, the shape factor circle is located to the front of the sites with low gradients to facilitate building development and access, transitioning the slope to the steeper areas to the rear of the site.
​E30​The extent of any positive impacts to the neighbourhood or the wider community, including the extent to which the activity might enhance the amenity of the area.
​E31​The extent to which the design of the dwelling or building within the 65m setback from the Waikato Expressway (Designation 90) considers effects from the Waikato Expressway, particularly:
i.​The extent of a reasonable internal noise environment
ii.​The siting of any principal outdoor living area to mitigate future traffic noise
iii.​The extent of any acoustic mitigation to new buildings or additions for habitable uses to mitigate noise.​
​E32The extent to which any principal outdoor living area within the 65m setback from the Waikato Expressway (Designation 90) is sited to mitigate the traffic noise of the future Waikato Ex​pressway, including whether it is located to the north of the dwelling to utilise noise attenuation provided by the building form.
​E33​The extent to which the acoustic mitigation of new residential buildings or additions to existing residential buildings for habitable uses will result in mitigating any noise issues generated from the operation of the Waikato Expressway (Designation 90).
Railway Park
​E34​The extent to which any new building or additions or alterations to an existing building in Railway Park (Lot 1 DP S37471) is compatible with the material, form and design of the surrounding residential development and existing buildings within Railway Park, in particular the Frankton Junction NZ Railways Institute Hall (Refer to Appendix 8, Schedule 8A, H44).​

​F

​Hazards and Safety​

​General
​F1​​The extent to which the size, location and design of the proposed building, infrastructure, structures, stored goods and materials, fences or walls:
​a)​Affects the scale, location and orientation of any overland flow path.
​b)​​Provides for sufficient permeability:​

​i.​So as not to obstruct any overland flow, and  
​ii.​​To mitigate the likelihood of debris becoming trapped.
​c)​Has sufficient height clearance to mitigate the risk of being affected by inundation.​
​d)​​Has the structural integrity to withstand inundation.
​F2​The extent to which an appropriate building platform can be provided free from any identified hazard area.​​
​F3​​The extent to which the applicant has demonstrated, through the use of an engineering design report:
​a)​That the risk of ground failure can be reduced to avoid the effects on the safety of occupiers and neighbours.​
​b)​That any structure will perform safely under hazard conditions for the life of the structure. 
​c)​That any work to be carried out maintains the stability of the river bank or gully and does not increase the risk of ground instability on the subject site or adjacent sites.​
​F4​​The extent to which a flood risk assessment report submitted, with the proposal, contains recommended refinements to the extent of any Flood Hazard Area as a result of additional flood hazard modelling or site specific topographical analysis.​​
Earthworks 
​F5​The extent to which the earthworks:
​a)​Will obstruct or provide overland flow paths or natural surface ponding areas.​
​b)Are managed, designed and constructed to:​
​i.​Provide any sediment control measures necessary to control the discharge of sediments.
ii.​​Remain safe and stable for the duration of the intended land use.
​iii.​Provide safe and accessible building sites and infrastructure.
​iv.​Provide for the adequate control of stormwater, cater for natural groundwater flows, and avoid adverse effects from changes to natural water flows and established drainage paths.
​v.​Avoid exacerbating the effects of natural hazards and ecological effects arising from additional sediment release.​
​ ​Hazardous Facilities​
​F6​The extent to which the proposed site design, construction and operation of a hazardous facility are appropriate to:​
​a)Avoid the accidental release, or loss of control, of hazardous substances, and whether adequate emergency and spill contingency plans are provided; and​
​b)​Avoid and mitigate any adverse effects resulting from activities on the site involving hazardous substances on people, property and environmentally sensitive areas.
​F7The extent to which off-site transport of hazardous substances has been adequately addressed, and the extent to which vehicles transporting hazardous substances use appropriate routes and do not use local transport corridors in residential areas.​
​F8​The extent to which the waste management plan adequately addresses the management of significant quantities of wastes containing hazardous substances, including procedures for disposal practices and use of waste contractors.
​F9​Where appropriate, the extent to which alternative locations have been considered adequately.
​F10​The extent to which  the risks presented by the hazardous facility to humans, the environment and property have been assessed fully and systematically, and whether they are able to be avoided or minimised satisfactorily.​
Nuisance and Health
​F11​The extent to which industrial activities giving rise to nuisance can be adequately managed or sited so as to reduce the impact on neighbouring sites.
​F12​The extent to which noise effects have been addressed in a noise management plan, including the location of specific noise generating activities, hours of amplified sound and the potential mitigation proposed.
​F13​The extent to which the activity may have adverse effects on the environment including water discharges, air pollution, noise and other emissions.
​F14​The extent to which any habitable rooms are located, oriented or designed in such a way that would make noise insulation to the required standards unnecessary.

​G

​Transportation

​General
​G1​The extent to which the proposal:
​a)​Integrates with, and minimises adverse effects on the safe and efficient functioning of the transport network and infrastructure.
​b)​Minimises conflicts between users both within the site and any adjoining transport corridor.
​c)​Encourages easy and safe access and circulation for those not arriving by vehicle.
​d)​Provides for the accessibility needs of all users of the site.
​e)​Provides convenient and safe circulation for connections and/or the provision of facilities for passenger transport modes of travel relative to the scale of the proposal.
​f)​Provides for integration with neighbouring activities to reduce the need for separate traffic movements on the transport network.
Note
Acceptable means of compliance for the provision, design and construction of infrastructure is contained within the Hamilton City Infrastructure Technical Specifications.
​G2The extent to which the proposal and the traffic (including nature and type of the traffic, volume and peak flows, travel routes) generated by the proposal:​
​a)​ ​Requires improvements, modifications or alterations to the transport network and infrastructure to mitigate its effects.​
​b)​Achieves efficient connectivity and accessibility of transport corridors, pedestrian accessways, cycleways, public reserves and green corridors.
​c)​Adversely affects the streetscape amenity, particularly in relation to sensitive land use environments (e.g. residential land use environments identified within Table 15-4a of Appendix 15).
​Integrated Transport Assessment

Note
In addition to the specific ITA criteria outlined in G3 to G6 below, the balance of criteria contained within Section G may be used to assess a simple or broad ITA where considered relevant. 
​G3The extent to which the proposal considers and responds to:​

​a)The issues, opportunities and shared outcomes in the Access Hamilton Strategy and its associated Action Plans.​
​b)​Relevant:
​i.​​New Zealand Transport Agency guidelines
​ii.​Kiwirail guidelines
​iii.Regional and national transport and growth strategies
​c)​The recommendations and proposed conditions of any integrated transport assessment prepared to accompany the application.
​d)​Issues and outcomes arising from consultation with the relevant road controlling authorities and/or Kiwirail.
​G4The extent to which the proposal incorporates travel demand management and is well-located to be served by passenger transport, or encourages other active modes of travel such as walking or cycling.​
​G5​The extent to which an integrated transport assessment assesses how the proposal and any mitigation measures ensure that the safety and efficiency of the transport network is maintained or enhanced.
​G6​Whether access restrictions, auxiliary lanes or other measures are necessary to provide for the safe and efficient operation of key transport corridors such as:​
​a)​Ma​jor arterial transport corridors
​b)​Transport corridors that are part of the Strategic Network
​c)​​Transport corridors carrying more than 20,000 vehicles per day or with four or more vehicle lanes.
Access
​G7​The extent to which the proposal minimises the number of vehicle access points to transport corridors, taking into account:​
​a)Opportunities that exist for shared access with adjoining sites.​
​b)​The hierarchy of the fronting transport corridor and opportunities that exist for access to transport corridors of a lower status (e.g. collector or local transport corridors or service lanes).
​c)​Traffic generated by the proposal.
​d)​The siting of the access points with respect to adjacent access points, visibility and flow.
​e)​The operational requirements of the proposal.
​f)Potential obstruction for access to network utilities.​
​g)​The appropriateness of restricting types of movements (e.g. left in/out only, entry or exit only).
​h)​The impact of multiple vehicle entrances (which break up berm, landscaping, footpath and cycleway continuity) on streetscape amenity, retail frontage areas and pedestrian and cycle movements.
​i)​The cumulative effects on traffic safety and efficiency from multiple vehicular accesses on to major arterial routes and whether this can be adequately addressed.
Parking​
​G8​Except in the Central City Zone where there are no minimum parking standards, the extent to which the proposal provides for anticipated parking demand to meet current and future needs.​
​G9​In assessing a lesser number of parking spaces and the adequacy of end-of-journey facilities, regard may be had for the following:
​a)The anticipated parking demand generated by the proposal including typical operating and peak conditions. Where it can be demonstrated that this is less than the number of spaces required by the standard a lesser number of parking spaces may be accepted.​
​b)​The hours of operation relative to other activities on the site or on adjoining sites and opportunities for sharing parking spaces.
​c)​The ability and appropriateness of adjacent transport corridors being used to accommodate on-road parking, particularly in regard to the safe and efficient operation of the transport network and the protection of local character.
​d)​The availability of appropriate off-road public parking in the locality.
​e)​Options for providing additional parking if required in the future.
​f)​The extent to which the provision of end-of-journey facilities, such as bicycle parking, showers, changing rooms and lockers are provided.
​g)​The extent to which provision for active modes of transport or travel planning has been made.
​h)​The availability of passenger transport services in the locality, the proximity of the proposed activity to passenger transport stops and the extent to which those passenger transport services are suited to providing for the transport needs of the proposed activity.
​G10In assessing whether the parking demand for a particular proposal may be provided on other sites, regard shall be given to the following:​
​a)​Whether off site parking is in close proximity with clear, safe and convenient access.
​b)​Whether shared parking provision is acceptable particularly where hours of operation are different.
​c)​The desirability of avoiding vehicular access to the site because of the effects on traffic safety or pedestrian amenity.
​d)​The convenience and safety of those using the parking spaces especially the general public.
​e)​Any arrangement for alternative parking provision is adequately secured by a legally binding mechanism.
​f)​The extent to which the safe and efficient functioning of the transport corridor is affected.
New Transport Corridor Design​
​G11​The extent to which transport corridor design provides design elements identified in or otherwise contrary to any criteria contained in Table 15-6a of Appendix 15.​
​G12​The extent to which the transport corridor design meets the traffic needs of the area and the wider transport network, taking into account the function of the corridor in the transport corridor hierarchy.​
G13​​The extent to which the width and alignment of the transport corridor is sufficient to accommodate, in a safe and efficient manner, the volume and type of traffic likely to use it, including service and emergency vehicles and heavy vehicles.
​G14​The adequacy of provision for the movement of pedestrians, cyclists, physically impaired and transport disadvantaged and any implications for their safety.
​G15​The adequacy of provision within the transport corridor for parking spaces relative to existing and potential developments on adjoining land.
​G16​The extent to which the extension to an existing, new or an upgraded transport corridor ‘matches’ the rest of the existing transport network (e.g. levels, design, construction).
​G17​The extent to which the design of the road allows for easy installation and maintenance of non-transport infrastructure and amenity tree planting.
​G18​The extent to which the design of the transport corridor recognises the character and amenity values of the adjacent land use.

Note
In considering the above matters Council may have regard to relevant parts of Austroads Design Guides and NZS 4404:2010 Land Development and Subdivision Infrastructure, and the Hamilton City Infrastructure Technical Specifications.

​H

​F​unctionality, Vitality and Amenity of Centres

​H1​The ​extent to which the proposed retail or office activity (having regard to its size, composition and characteristics), in conjunction with other established or consented retail or office activity:
​a)Avoids adverse effects on the vitality, function and amenity of the Central City and sub-regional centres that go beyond those effects ordinarily associated with competition on trade competitors. ​
​b)​Avoids the inefficient use of existing physical resources and promotes a compact urban form. 
​c)Promotes the efficient use of existing and planned public and private investment in infrastructure. ​
​d)​Reinforces the primacy of the Central City and the functions of other centres in the business hierarchy.  
To demonstrate the above criteria can be satisfied an applicant must supply a Centre Assessment report. The content of the Centre Assessment report shall be prepared in accordance with clause 1.2.2.17. ​
​H2​Whether and to what ​extent the proposed Supermarket activity in the Industrial, Business 1 or 4 zones:
​a)Avoids adverse effects on the vitality, function and amenity of the Central City and sub-regional centres that go beyond those effects ordinarily associated with competition on trade competitors. ​
​b)​Avoids the inefficient use of existing physical resources and promotes a compact urban form. 
​c)​Promotes the efficient use of existing and planned public and private investment in infrastructure. 
​d)​Is located within a catchment where suitable land is not available within the business centres.
​e)​Reinforces the primacy of the Central City and does not undermine the role and function of other centres within the business hierarchy where they are within the same catchment as the proposed supermarket.
To demonstrate the above criteria can be satisfied an applicant must supply a Centre Assessment report. The content of the Centre Assessment report shall be prepared in accordance with clause 1.2.2.17.​

​I

Network Utilities and Transmission​

Network Utilities
​I1​The extent to which alternative technologies and techniques have been considered.
​I2The extent to which co-location of overhead electricity and telecommunication lines is technically, economically and practically reasonable.
​I3​The extent to which the proposal is in accordance with relevant industry standards and meets specified clearance requirements for operational and safety reasons.
​I4​The extent to which the proposal will adversely affect the amenity values of the site and locality.
​I5​The extent to which there are difficult ground conditions, topography or obstructions which make undergrounding impractical.
​I6​The extent to which it is necessary for the proposed site to provide and maintain essential network utility services.
Electricity Transmission
​I7​The extent to which the location, height, scale, orientation and use of buildings and structures is appropriate to manage the following effects.

a)The risk to the structural integrity of the transmission line.
​b)​The effects on the ability of the transmission line owner to access, operate, maintain and upgrade the transmission network.
​c)​The risk of electrical hazards affecting public or individual safety, and risk of property damage.
​d)​The extent of earthworks required, and use of mobile machinery near transmission lines, which may put the line at risk.
​e)​Minimising adverse effects including reverse sensitivity, visual and nuisance effects and from transmission lines. 
Note
Consultation with Transpower New Zealand Ltd (or its successor) is advised when considering construction within Transmission Corridors A or B. The New Zealand Electrical Code of Practice NZECP: 34 contain restrictions on the location of structures in relation to lines.
​I8The extent of separation between specified building envelopes and existing lines ensures any adverse effects on and from the Electricity Transmission network and on public safety are appropriately avoided, remedied or mitigated.​
​I9​The extent of separation between the location of any proposed trees and existing lines, taking into account:

​a)​The likely mature height of the trees,
​b)​Whether they have potential to interfere with the lines, and 
​c)​Whether an alternative location for the trees would be more suitable to meet the operational requirements of the lines’ owner.
Note
All trees/vegetation planted in the transmission corridor must achieve compliance with the Electricity (Hazards from Trees) Regulations 2003.​
​I10​The extent to which appropriate safeguards are in place to avoid contact or flashovers from lines, and effects on the stability of support structures.
Note
All earthworks, including the use of mobile plant, must comply with the requirements of the New Zealand Electrical Code of Practice 34:2001 (NZECP34:2001).
​I11​The extent to which the design of the subdivision, any earthworks and the construction of any subsequent buildings will comply with the safe separation distance requirements in NZECP34:2001.  

​​J

​Three Waters Capacity and Techniques​

​J1​The extent to which the proposal:
​a)​Can be adequately serviced by capacity within existing Three Waters infrastructure, including access to and use of an appropriate and sustainable water source.
​b)​Can dispose of stormwater and wastewater without adversely affecting the surrounding environment.
​J2Whether the servicing needs of the proposal would necessitate additional public investment in Three Waters infrastructure, services or amenities.​
Note 
Information requirements relating to WIA or ICMP applications are outlined in Volume 2, Appendix 1.2.
​J3​The extent to which the proposal is consistent with the provisions of any Integrated Catchment Management Plan (ICMP) relevant to the site and a consideration of consent conditions imposed in order to achieve that consistency.
​J4​Where there is no ICMP, the extent to which the proposal incorporates sustainable management techniques and controls to:
​a)Protect water quality.​
​b)​Protect the integrity and health of any water courses.
​c)​Maintain land stability.
​d)​Limit erosion and sedimentation.
​e)​Limit water wastage.
​f)​Limit the generation of stormwater and wastewater.
​g)​Limit water usage.
​J5Where there is no ICMP, for all new industrial and commercial users with a requirement for high volumes and pressures, the extent to which onsite water storage is provided.​
​J6​Where there is no ICMP, for development that will create a trade waste discharge:
​a)The extent to which suitable and safe practices will be employed.​
​b)​The extent to which such waste can be treated or pre-treated onsite to improve the quality of the waste or decrease the amount of the waste, prior to any discharge to the municipal wastewater treatment network.
​J7Where there is no ICMP, the extent to which any physical works associated with the proposal affects stormwater storage and retention and whether an equivalent capacity is restored at the completion of works.​

​K

​Major Facilities Concept Development Consent Consistency​

​General
​K1​The extent to which the proposal is consistent with the approved Concept Development Consent for the Major Facility.
Concept Development Consent 
​K2​The extent to which the preparation of a Concept Development Consent or an update to an existing Concept Development Consent has given regard to the following.
a)The extent to which the major facility integrates with surrounding land uses and transport network.​
b​)The extent to which the development has been designed to minimise, as far as practicable, any adverse effects on adjoining activities, particularly residential activities.
​c)​The extent to which any large façades (including side walls) that are visible from public places have been modulated, articulated, detailed or visually treated in a way that reduces the apparent bulk of the building or provides visual interest.
​d)​The extent to which the proximity of facilities intended to accommodate events are sited close to residential areas.
​e)​The extent to which the provision for vehicular and pedestrian access and circulation facilitates ready dispersal of vehicles and patrons from large events.
f​)​The extent to which provision for vehicular and pedestrian access and circulation prioritises pedestrian safety.
​g)The extent to which appropriate, convenient provisions enable public transport to service the site, recognising the need for such services to directly access the Central City area.​
​h)​The extent to which signage is directed primarily at the patrons attending the venues and television audiences and the extent to which visibility is limited from any public space or near-by site, with the exception of signage associated with the naming of the major facility and signs that advertise coming events.
​i)​The extent to which the adverse effects of earthworks are managed.
​K3The extent to which the following have been applied as part of a new Concept Development Consent, an update to an existing Concept Development Consent or in the absence of a Concept Development Consent ​within the Interface Areas of all Major Facility Sites.​
​a)​Built Form and Layout
​i.​The extent to which the external appearance, scale and design of buildings
•  Contributes to compatibility between buildings and its integration with other development on the site, adjacent sites and surrounding public spaces.
•  Contributes to active frontage along public streets and open space, particularly for corner sites.
•  Minimises, as practicable, effects on adjacent public spaces (including footpaths) in terms of shading and daylight.
​ii.​The extent to which building design and development 
•  Makes a positive contribution to the local character of the site and surrounding areas.
•  Ensures large façades are well designed to provide visual interest and reduce the apparent bulk of buildings within the Interface Area.
​iii.​The extent to which Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design principles have been incorporated.
​b)Landscaping​
​i.​Incorporation of landscaping within the site layout to reduce the bulk of new development and mitigate adverse visual effects of development within the Interface Area, particularly as they interact with public spaces.
​ii.​Incorporates landscaping to maintain and enhance the character and amenity of the site and surrounding areas.
Claudelands Events Centre​
​K4​The extent to which the open space character of the eastern part of the site is maintained and in particular whether a suitable buffer is provided adjoining Jubilee Park.
Te Rapa Racecourse
​K5​The extent to which development of the site retains views between the racecourse and Minogue Park.
Waikato Hospital Complex
​K6​The extent to which activities of an industrial nature and the heliport are grouped in the south-western sector of the site.
​K7​The extent to which high rise buildings are concentrated towards the centre of the hospital complex.
Waikato Stadium and Seddon Park
​K8​The extent to which future buildings and the enhancement of facilities, including any provision for office, retail and visitor accommodation, ensure a high degree of functional integration within the site.
​K9​The extent to which security fencing is unobtrusive and maintains views of the Stadia grounds from surrounding streets, accepting that no views will be available of the principal playing surfaces and that the Stadia need to ensure the security of the venues as ‘charge grounds’.
​K10​The extent to which the bulk and location of additional buildings at Waikato Stadium and Seddon Park has been designed and constructed to minimise the extent and duration of shading cast over residential sites. 
​K11​The extent to which the design and appearance of any replacement grandstand or a substantial alteration to an existing grandstand aims to create an enduring statement and identity, which reflects the pre-eminent role of these sites in hosting international events. Additionally, the extent to which recognition is provided for the cultural heritage of the Whatanoa Gateway.​
​K12​The extent to which the Mill Street frontage of the Waikato Stadium, including the Mill Street Field, is maintained as open space to continue the historical association with the West Town Belt, providing an attractive vista, enhancing links with the Central City area and the Stadium building.
​K13​The extent to which development and landscaping proposals provide for the retention of the existing Kahikatea trees on the Seddon Road frontage of the Waikato stadium and the existing mature trees on the Norton Road and Tristram Street frontages of Seddon Park.
Wintec Rotokauri Campus
​K14​The extent to which development of the site has regard to the future development of the Rotokauri Area and the relationship of the site with Lake Waiwhakareke and the Rotokauri Suburban Centre.
​K15​The extent to which farming activities are adequately buffered from neighbouring Residential or Special Character Zones.

​L

​Central City – Design and Layout​

​L1​The extent to which the streetscape appearance, scale and design of the building (including material and colour):
​a)Will ​add visual interest and vitality to the streetscape and avoids large, featureless façades. For example, through articulation of a façade, attention to fenestration and rooflines, the design of verandas and balconies and the careful choice of materials and colour.
​b)​Will, where practicable, enable informal surveillance of public spaces including streets, parks, plazas and through-site links.
​c)​Are compatible with heritage or open space values of the Riverfront Overlay area and adjoining riverbank area, where sites are within those areas.
​d)​Activates the site frontage on sites adjoining a defined Primary or Secondary Active Frontage (Volume 2, Appendix 5, Figure 5-7). 
​e)​Enhances the experience of the Waikato riverside and Garden Place, where sites are adjacent.
​f)​Enhance those parts of a site adjoining a defined view and vista on Figure 5-6 (Volume 2, Appendix 5).
​g)​Enhance the visual amenity of sites identified as Key Development Sites on Figure 5-7, or Pedestrian Connections and Gateway locations identified on Figure 5-4 (Volume 2, Appendix 5).
​h)​Will, where practicable, provide for public entrances to be on frontages with the highest pedestrian traffic.​
​L2The extent to which any proposed building setback will adversely affect the definition, use or safety of public spaces, or the continuity of defined primary or secondary active frontages (Volume 2, Appendix 5, Figure 5-7). 
​L3​The extent to which the addition of an awning would detract from the original character of an identified heritage building in Schedule 8A and 8B of Appendix 8.
​L4​The extent to which the proposed building design and/or site layout is consistent with the intent of any relevant design guide in Appendix 1, Section 1.4.
Note
If an activity is a Restricted Discretionary Activity in relation to Design and Layout matters and there is a relevant design guide, then the activity should seek to address the outcomes sought in the design guide as a priority over relevant criteria in this section.
​L5The extent to which the external appearance, scale and design of buildings and structures: ​
​a)Enhance the character and amenity of the surrounding area and streetscape qualities.​
​b)​Incorporate Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design principles.
​L6The extent to which parking, manoeuvring areas, driveways and outdoor service areas have been designed and located:​
​a)​To protect amenity values of the streetscape and adjoining sites, including through the use of appropriate screening and landscaping.
​b)​To not be visually dominant.
​c)​Where appropriate, to integrate with adjacent activities and development in terms of the provision of entrances, publicly accessible spaces, verandas, parking, loading areas, access to public transport and pedestrian linkages.​
​L7Where opportunity is available, and it is practicable, the extent to which any proposal provides or enhances pedestrian and cycle connectivity between streets and other public areas.​
​L8​Where required, the extent to which planting and landscaping is used to:
​a)​Visually reduce the bulk of new development and mitigate adverse visual effects particularly from the front boundary and those parts of the site visible from public spaces.
​b)​Create an attractive environment that maintains safety and amenity for pedestrians.​
​L9​The extent to which developments provide for goods handling, storage, waste and recycling ar​eas that are located and designed to minimise adverse effects.
​L10​The extent to which development encourages pedestrian access to, and facilitates public use and enjoyment of, the promenade and environs of the Waikato River.
​L11​On those identified streets (Volume 2, Appendix 5, Figure 5-3) the extent to which a proposed street wall or alternative design elements of any proposed building frontage will: 
​a)Provide consistency in built form and scale with adjoining built form.​
​b)​Maintain a human scale when perceived from the street level.
​c)​Maintain sunlight penetration at street level, particularly footpaths.
​L12In relation to the setbacks from internal boundaries at upper levels (i.e. fourth level and above), the extent to which the proposal minimises shadowing and loss of natural light on existing adjacent residential buildings. ​
​L13​The extent to which development of a site adjoining the riverbank: 
​a)Provides a scale and design of any building or structure that maintains or enhances street and reserve areas, the character and amenity, and the heritage or open space values of the adjoining riverbank area.​
​b)​Makes provision for building design and configuration, site layout and/or landscaping which enhances the visual and physical relationship with the Waikato River.
​c)​Mitigates the impact of large developments and vehicular oriented activities on the amenity values of the riverbank environment.​

​M

Drive-through Services (Business Zones and Central City Zone - City Living Precinct on​ly), Building Improvement Centre (Business 3 and 5 Zones) and Supermarkets (Central City, Business and Industrial Zones)  ​

Design and Layout
​M1​The extent to which the external appearance, scale and design of buildings (including material and colour), equipment and structures:
​a)​Provide visual interest through a variety of styles and forms in terms of footprint, design and height.
​b)​Maintain streetscape amenity and continuity of built form.
​c)​Within the Central City Zone, whether any proposed building setback will adversely affect the definition, use or safety of public spaces, or the continuity of defined primary or secondary active frontages (Volume 2, Appendix 5, Figure 5-7).
​M2The extent to which parking, manoeuvring areas, driveways and outdoor service areas have been designed and located: ​
​a)​To appropriately manage any adverse effects resulting from the location and interrelationship between these areas on streetscape amenity.
​b)​To ensure traffic generation avoids, remedies or mitigates adverse effects on amenity values.
​c)​So as not to compromise the safe use of the footpath adjacent to the site.
​d)​To integrate with adjacent activities and development in terms of the provision of entrances, publicly accessible spaces, parking, loading areas, access to public transport and pedestrian linkages.
Landscaping and Screening​
​M3​The extent to which planting and landscaping is used to:
​a)Mitigate adverse visual effects particularly from the front boundary and those parts of the site visible from public spaces and interfaces along state highways, arterial transport corridors and City gateways.​
​b)​Create an attractive environment that maintains safety and amenity for pedestrians.
Waste Management​
​M4​The extent to which developments provide for goods handling, storage, waste and recycling areas that are:
​a)​Easily accessible for collection agencies and avoid adverse visual, noise or odour effects.
​b)​Consistent with the amenity values of the site and avoid causing nuisance for neighbouring residential activities.
​c)​Suitable for the demand expected by the activity.
Character and Amenity​
​M5​The extent to which the activity makes adequate provision to protect the visual and acoustic privacy of abutting sites including through building and site design.
​M6​Considering whether the relationship of buildings and their associated parking, storage and service areas to the street helps to maintain the amenity values of public spaces and streets.
​M7​The extent to which any parking or service area is provided, landscaped, screened and maintained in a form which mitigates any adverse effects to adjacent activities and does not detract from the streetscape.​
Drive-through Services
​M8​For the purpose of assessing the above criteria, regard shall be had to the following operational and functional requirements: 
​a)The ​drive-through lane is an integral feature of the site layout.
​b)​Customer car parking access is preferably distinct from drive-through lanes.
​c)​Adequate and accessible servicing areas that are preferably separated from customer vehicle traffic, drive-through lanes and pedestrian movements.​
Building Improvement Centres​
​M9For the purpose of assessing the above criteria, regard shall be had to the following operational and functional requirements: ​
​a)Where large-format building formats are required, there is provision for some solid façades to facilitate internal racking of bulky products.​
​b)​The provision of appropriate customer car parking, which is clearly visible from the local road network.
​c)​Adequate and accessible servicing areas that are preferably separated from customer vehicle traffic, timber trade sales access and pedestrian movements.
Supermarkets
​M10​For the purpose of assessing the above criteria, regard shall be had to the following operational and functional requirements:
​a)​Store visibility that is easily identifiable when viewed from the street and surrounding area.​
​b)​The provision of appropriate customer car parking, which is clearly visible and accessible to motorists approaching the store from the local roading network and to customers on-site.
​c)​Where large-format building formats are required, there is provision for some solid façades to facilitate internal shelving and fresh produce display.
​d)​Adequate and accessible servicing areas that are preferably separated from customer vehicle traffic and pedestrian movements. ​

​N​

Ruakura​ 

N1
Land Development Plans

In determining the application for resource consent for a restricted discretionary activity, Council shall reserve its discretion to the following matters, where relevant.

a)Integration with and effects on transport and Three Waters infrastructure.

b)Consistency with any relevant Integrated Catchment Management Plan or regional discharge consent.

c)Effects on significant habitats of indigenous fauna and habitat values of natural water courses.

d)Open Space and road reserve design, layout and use.

e)Consistency with the Ruakura Strategic Infrastructures network for the structure plan as shown on Figures 2-15A and B Ruakura Strategic Infrastructure (Appendix 2).

f)Where staged development of any Land Development Area is sought then the following information for the balance area shall be provided:
i.The indicative location and width of proposed roads and carriageways and their integration with the existing and future transport network;
ii.The indicative location of proposed Ruakura Strategic Infrastructure to ensure connectivity across the entire structure plan and adjacent Land Development Plan Areas.

g)Construction effects.

h)Effects of new stormwater ponds and wetlands (excluding swales) on private property.

In determining the application, the Council shall consider the following assessment criteria:

i)Whether there is appropriate Three Waters infrastructure and capacity, existing and proposed, to appropriately service anticipated development in the Land Development Plan area. For new stormwater ponds and wetlands, the extent to which the following adverse effects of the works on adjacent private property are avoided:
i.Flooding and adverse effects on ground water levels; and
ii.
Creating habitat for mosquitoes and other undesirable insects.

j)
Whether the proposal is consistent with, or otherwise complies with, the recommendations, measures and targets of any relevant Integrated Catchment Management Plan.

k)Whether anticipated development in the Land Development Plan area integrates with, and minimises adverse effects on the safe and efficient functioning of the transport network and transport infrastructure, having regard to the cumulative traffic effects of other approved Land Development Plans. The extent to which the Land Development Plan provides for the sequential extension of the Spine Road. 

l)Whether the Land Development Plan is consistent with the Figure 2-18 Cyclist and Pedestrian Network Plan (Appendix 2).

m)The ITA matters for assessment set out in Appendix 1.3.3 G.

n)Whether the Land Development Plan considers and responds to the recommendations and proposed conditions of the Integrated Transport Assessment and Water Impact Assessment prepared to accompany the application.

o)The potential for cumulative construction noise effects to adversely affect individual residential properties, and the mitigation methods proposed to minimise such effects.

p)Whether the Land Development Plan considers and responds to issues and outcomes arising from consultation with relevant road controlling agencies, the New Zealand Transport Agency and, where relevant, KiwiRail.

q)Whether appropriate consideration has been given to electrical hazards and earthworks and ground level changes associated with the installation of underground Infrastructure within 12 metres of a National Grid support structure.

r)Where land development will cause loss of significant habitats of indigenous fauna (including but not limited to, black mudfish, shortfin eels and longfin eels), require that unavoidable adverse effects on such habitat are remedied or mitigated through:
i.Replacing significant habitat; or
ii.Creating new habitat; or
iii.Enhancing areas of alternative habitat supporting similar ecological values and/or significance; and
iv.Legal and physical protection.

s)Whether land development will adversely affect the flooding, water quality and habitat values of adjoining natural water courses.

t)Whether the Landscape Concept and Ecological Enhancement Plan provides for a comprehensive and connected section of Open Space and road reserves, which incorporates, as necessary:
i.connectivity of open space and streets;
ii.passive and active recreation opportunities;
iii.Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design principles;
iv.pedestrian and cycle paths forming a network with adjacent parts of the Open Space network;
v.general amenity planting and amenity for adjoining properties, including use of specimen trees in roads;
vi.street furniture;
vii.provision for habitats;
viii.lighting design that does not deter bat movement; and
ix.stormwater management.

u)Whether the Land Development Plan will appropriately provide for indigenous fish and lizards.

v)Whether the Land Development Plan includes a greenway that provides for improved habitat and ecological benefits.

w)Whether the Landscape Concept and Ecological Enhancement Plan provides for a greenway to enhance long term ecological function.
​x)​Where the boundaries of a Land Development Plan Area in application for Land Development Consent differ from those shown on Figure 2-16, the extent of the Land Development Plan Area shall be developed in an integrated manner. This shall  include the provision for and connectivity to infrastructure, and ensure that key infrastructure such as the Spine Road is developed in a manner that provides at least the same levels of efficiency, effectiveness and safety anticipated through a land development consent in accordance with Figure 2-16. Where an application includes part of a Land Development Plan Area in Figure 2-16 it shall be demonstrated that granting consent to that part will not prevent the integrated development of the balance of that Area.

Additional Matters for Open Space

y)Whether the layout and design of Open Space:
i.Creates an informal parkland character;
ii.Integrates with the landscape design of roads within the Land Development Plan area;
iii.Applies Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design principles;
iv.Utilises planting to soften the views of industrial development;
v.Contains pedestrian and cycle paths forming a network with adjacent parts of the Open Space Network;
vi.Provides for the amenity of adjoining and adjacent activities;
vii.Integrates linear wetlands and stormwater treatment devices.

z)Whether provision has been made to ensure public access to and use of the Open Space, except as may need to be limited for safety reasons.​

aa)The extent to which the different functions of Open Space are clearly identified and provided for in the Land Development Plan application. ​

Additional Matters for the Medium Density Residential Zone

bb)
The extent to which the street network promotes a high degree of connectivity and permeability through the following:
i. A grid-like street layout.
ii. Block sizes that promote permeability for pedestrians/cyclists as well as for vehicles.
iii. Connections to the City-wide arterial networks.
iv. Paths to the Open Space Network.

cc)Street amenity shall be provided by the location of specimen trees and landscaped areas interspersed by kerb-side parking.
​​​dd)When assessing the suitability for residential buildings to be within the side yards, regard shall be given to the following:
i.     The extent to which reasonable sunlight and daylight access to adjacent dwellings and                   outdoor living areas will be affected.
ii.    The extent to which pedestrian access to the rear of the site will be hindered.
iii.  
The extent to which on-site amenity is maintained. 

Additional Matters for Precinct C within the Knowledge Zone

ee)
The extent to which the street network is:
i. Orientated toward the Ruakura Retail Centre.
ii. Permeable for pedestrians/cyclists as well as for vehicles.
iii. Legible with a simple and readily understood street pattern.
iv. Provides a connected path network to the Ruakura Open Space Zone.

ff)The extent to which blocks and lots are configured to facilitate walking and accommodate operational areas in rear yards.

Additional Matters for the Logistics Zone (Inland Port) 

gg)Whether the planting of the Landscape Buffer Areas will achieve the purpose of screening the Inland Port (Sub Area A (Inland Port)) from Ryburn and Percival Roads.

hh)The effects of the planting of the Landscape Buffer Areas on the operation, maintenance, upgrading and development of the National Grid transmission network and the requirements of the Growth Limit Zones Schedule of the Electricity (Hazards from Trees) Regulations 2003.

ii)Whether Level of Service D will be achieved at the intersections of Silverdale Road and Knighton Road with Ruakura Road when Stage 1 of the Inland Port (Sub Area A (Inland Port)) is operational.

Construction ​​​
jj)
Whether appropriate conditions can be placed on the resource consent to manage adverse effects associated with construction of the activities proposed in the Land Development Plan. This will be satisfied by a condition requiring the lodgement of a Construction Management Plan for Council approval, prior to the commencement of the works.

 
The Construction Management Plan shall include at a minimum:
i.Details of the works, their timing and duration.
ii.Methods to control dust, debris on roads and silt laden runoff during construction.
iii.Anticipated truck movements and routes to and from the site during construction.
iv.Means to ensure compliance with the Construction Noise Standards in Rule 25.8.3.2 and Construction Vibration Standard in Rule 25.8.3.3. 
v.Contact details for the contractor, including a process for complaints and remedying concerns.​
​The Construction Management Plan shall also ensure that:​
​​vi.Prior to the opening of the Waikato Expressway (Hamilton Section) and the realignment of Ruakura Road to traffic, construction traffic arising from the Land Development Plan area shall be managed to ensure that the capacity of local roads, as determined by normal Hamilton City Council traffic management design criteria, is not exceeded.
vii.​Once the Waikato Expressway (Hamilton Section) and realigned Ruakura Road are open for traffic, construction traffic arising from the Land Development Plan area shall, to the extent reasonable and practicable, be directed to use the Waikato Expressway (Hamilton Section) to minimise effects on local roads.​
N2
Construction Noise and Operation Noise of the Inland Port (Sub Area A)

a)The extent to which:
i.The construction and operation of the Inland Port avoids or mitigates adverse noise and vibration effects on adjoining facilities, existing residential dwellings and/or Large Lot Residential zoned areas.
ii.Measures to avoid where possible, and otherwise minimise sudden and/or loud noises at night have been incorporated.
iii.Lower noise producing equipment and methods have been investigated and incorporated.
iv.The location and orientation of refrigerated containers have been selected to minimise noise effects on residential properties.
v.The accuracy of the noise model used for predicting noise levels in Stages 2 and 3 of the development of the Inland Port, taking into account recalibration based on monitoring of previous stages.

b)The adequacy of the consideration of alternative methods that would meet the night time noise limits set out in Rule 25.8.3.13 and their costs and benefits.

c)At individual residential properties where noise levels would exceed the night-times noise limits set out in Rule 25.8.3.13, the extent to which the ambient night-time noise levels at those properties exceed 40 dBLAeq(15) once the Waikato Expressway is operational.
N3​Ruakura Retail Centre ​ ​
a)Staged development should be in accordance with an overall master plan for the Ruakura Retail Centre which shall show the location of the Ruakura Retail Centre Mainstreet, building footprints, circulation network, public open space and provision for parking.
b)A Ruakura Retail Centre Mainstreet shall be provided and should be orientated towards and integrate with the location of the proposed transport interchange.
c)Buildings should directly align and address the street network and provide a constant and intact edge to streets and public places.
d)Buildings should be located and designed to avoid extensive or inactive edges with entrances designed to maximise pedestrian flow and to support active street frontages.
e)​Building frontages to the Ruakura Retail Centre Mainstreet should incorporate a high proportion of glazing and provide veranda canopies over footpaths and a high level of ground floor architectural detail.
f)Building design should create a varied fine grained pattern of development through the modulation of height and roof form, façade depth and relief and variety in materials and colours.
g)Site Layout should provide options for pedestrian, cycling and vehicular circulation and permeability within and to adjoining areas.
h)Footpaths should be legible and be of a sufficient width with quality paving and detailing, including footpaths to and from the centre and Open Space Areas.
i)Where public open space is provided, it should be centrally located adjacent to main pedestrian flows and shall be highly visible.
j)Public outdoor spaces should be sheltered and sunny with provision for summer shade and shall be anchored by active building edges.
k)Carparks should be landscaped to define the street boundary and adjacent spaces.
l)Carparking should avoid interrupting active frontages and pedestrian circulation along the Ruakura Retail Centre Mainstreet.
m)Loading and service areas should not interrupt active edges and should be separated from public circulation where possible.
N4Concept Plan for Precincts A, B and D in the Knowledge Zone
a)General ​
The extent to which the proposal is consistent with the approved Concept Plan for the Precinct within the Knowledge Zone.
b)Concept Plan Development
i.The extent to which the preparation of a Concept Plan or an update to an existing Concept Plan has given regard to the following.
a)The extent to which the precinct integrates with surrounding land uses and the transport network.
b)Whether the development has been designed to minimise any adverse effects on adjoining activities, particularly residential activities.
c)The degree to which any large façades (including side walls) that are visible from public places have been modulated, articulated, detailed or visually treated in a way that reduces the apparent bulk of the building or provides visual interest.​
d)The extent to which the proximity of facilities intended to accommodate events are sited close to residential areas.
e)The extent to which the provision for vehicular and pedestrian access and circulation facilitates ready dispersal of vehicles and patrons from large events.
f)The extent to which provision for vehicular and pedestrian access and circulation prioritises pedestrian safety.
g)The extent to which appropriate, convenient provisions enable public transport to service the site, recognising the need for such services to directly access the Central City area.
ii.The extent to which the following have been applied as part of a new Concept Plan, an update to an existing Concept Plan or in the absence of a Concept Plan within the Interface Areas of Precincts A, B and D.​
​​
a) Built Form and Layout​​
     i.  The extent to which the external appearance, scale and design of buildings:
           • Contributes to compatibility between buildings and its integration with other                     development on the site, adjacent sites and surrounding public spaces;
          • Contributes to active frontage along public streets and open space, particularly                  for corner sites;
          • Minimises, as practicable, effects on adjacent public spaces (including footpaths)                in terms of shading and daylight.
   ii.  The extent to which building design and development:
         • Makes a positive contribution to the local character of the site and surrounding                 areas;
         • Ensure large facades are well designed to provide visual interest and reduce the                 apparent bulk of buildings within the Interface Area;
         • The extent to which crime prevention through environmental design principles                   have been incorporated.
b) Landscaping​
i.Incorporation of landscaping within the site layout to reduce the bulk of new development and mitigate adverse visual effects of development within the Interface Area, particularly as they interact with public spaces.
ii.Incorporates landscaping to maintain and enhance the character and amenity of the site and surrounding areas.
N5​Ruakur​a Open Space Zone ​ ​
a)For new stormwater ponds and wetlands, the extent to which adverse effects of the works on adjacent private property are avoided in relation to:
i.Flooding and adverse effects on groundwater levels; and
ii.Creating habitat for mosquitoes and other undesirable insects
N6Development within a Greenfield Area ​​
a)The extent to which the proposal is consistent with an approved Land Development Plan or could prejudice or foreclose options for future urban development and in particular with the proposals shown on Figure 2-14, Ruakura Structure Plan – Land use (Appendix 2).

National Grid Corridors
N7For crossing points for Mobile Plant that are a Restricted Discretionary Activity in Table 25.7.4, the matters to which the Council shall restrict its discretion are limited to the actual and potential effects of crossing points on the scale and efficient operation and maintenance of the National Grid. 
N8In determining any application for resource consent for crossing points, the Council shall have regard to the following matters:
a)Suitable mechanisms are in place to ensure that mobile plant and machinery moving in the National Grid Yard can not infringe safe clearance distances specified in NZECP:34.  This may include physical, operational or electronic measures and will be deemed satisfied by overhead gate structures (e.g. hurdles) being erected no closer than 4.5 metres from the lowest sag of the line at maximum operating temperature.
b)Crossings are approximately perpendicular to the National Grid Yard.
c)Crossings and any associated traffic management structures are located no closer than 12 metres from the outer visible edge of a National Grid support structure.
d)Any overhead gate structure (e.g. hurdle) is constructed to a suitable engineering standard to withstand vehicle (including mobile plant transporting containers) impact travelling at normal operating speed.
e)Appropriate management and operational methods to ensure safe procedures are specified in the resource consent conditions and followed when crossing beneath the lines.
N9
F​or the unloading and loading of containers, stacking containers, container stacks, operation of mobile plant associated with these activities and Light Towers, noise walls and fences greater than 2.5 metres high, the matters to which the Council shall restrict its discretion are limited to the actual and potential effects of these structures, buildings and activities on the safe and efficient operation and maintenance of the National Grid.

 
In determining any applications for resource consent for these structures, buildings and activities, the Council shall have regard to the following matters.​
a)Any operational procedures and physical measures to ensure compliance with NZECP:34, including layout and allowable height limits for container stacking.
b)Light towers shall ensure sufficient clearances in accordance with NZECP:34 are provided including any setback requirements for mobile plant required for maintenance and lamp replacement.
c)Suitable mechanisms are in place to ensure that mobile plant and machinery moving in the National Grid Corridor can not infringe safe clearance distances specified in NZECP:34.  This may include physical, operational or electronic measures.
N10For earthworks that are a Restricted Discretionary Activity the matters to which the Council shall restrict its discretion are limited to:
a)The effects of the earthworks on the operation, maintenance, upgrading, and development of the National Grid transmission network.
N11For Subdivision that is a Restricted Discretionary Activity the matters to which the Council shall restrict its discretion are limited to:
a)The extent to which the subdivision design, including the location of roads and reserves, landscaping and building platforms, allows for activities to be set back  from National Grid transmission lines to ensure adverse effects on,  and from, the National Grid and on  public safety are  appropriately avoided, remedied or mitigated.  
b)The extent to which the subdivision design/layout and consequential development will minimise the potential reverse sensitivity on, and amenity and nuisance effects of, the National Grid.  
c)The provision for on-going inspection, operation, maintenance and development of the National Grid, including continued reasonable access.
d)The extent to which the design and development will minimise the risk of injury and/or property damage from such lines.
e)Compliance with the New Zealand Electrical Code of Practice for Electrical Safe Distances (NZECP: 34).
f)Outcomes of any consultation with Transpower New Zealand Limited.
Page reviewed: 06 Mar 2019 11:44am