​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​1.2 Information Requirements

​Where noted and relevant the following information is to be supplied with applications for resource consents and certificates of compliance. 

 
Any information and plans provided must be in writing and in sufficient detail and accuracy to enable a full assessment of compliance with the District Plan and to evaluate any environmental effects of the proposal. 

 
Note
1. Wherever possible application material should also be provided in an electronic format. 
Checklists, forms, templates and guides are available from Council. Further general guidance on the Act and its processes is available from the Ministry for the Environment website: www.mfe.govt.nz/rma/index.html

​1.2.1 All Applications

a)Description o​f the proposal
An i​ntroductory background providing a clear description of:
​i.The proposed activity and how it is intended to operate (including information such as hours of use, numbers of users, etc).
​ii.The proposed use of all existing and proposed buildings on the site.
​iii.The current use of the site.
​iv.Resource consents applied for, identifying what aspects of the proposal do not comply with relevant standards and assessment criteria within the District Plan (including any plan changes or variations).
b)Le​gal description of the subject site
​i.Street address, legal description and allotment area(s) of the subject site.
​ii.A copy of the current Certificate of Title(s) for the subject site and documents detailing any associated:

•  Consent notices
•  Easement documents
•  Hamilton City Council covenants
•  Building line restrictions
Note
1. Certifi​cates of Title may be obtained from Land Information New Zealand. Please ensure that the Certificate of Title consists of both the cover page and attached pages showing the survey plan.
c)Locality plan
A localit​y plan or aerial photograph showing the physical location of the subject site in relation to adjoining roads and sites.
Note
1. One copy at a ​scale of 1:500 is required with all applications.​
d)Sit​e plan/s
Sho​wing the following.
​i.North point.
​ii.Allotment boundaries and dimensions.
​iii.Date the plans were drawn.
​iv.Any historic or natural feature identified in Appendix 8 or Appendix 9 as follows:
​v.Other natural features (e.g. wetlands, springs, streams, location of banks).
​vi.Frontages to public road (noting the road’s hierarchy in the Transport Corrido​r Hierarchy Plans in Appendix 15, Figures 15-4B to 15-4F).
​vii.Locations and layout of existing and proposed buildings (including key dimensions from buildings to boundaries).
​viii.Floor plans showing the internal room layout and identifying the floor area and any habitable rooms (the outline of any upper storey should be indicated on the site plan).
​ix.Access and vehicle crossings from road boundaries to parking, loading and manoeuvring areas.
​x.Location of buildings on adjoining sites.​
​xi.Location, layout and dimensions of existing and proposed:

•  Parking spaces (cars, motorbikes, bicycle, accessible)
•  Loading spaces
•  Service areas
•  Living court areas
•  Storage areas

​xii.Location, layoutdimensions and description of existing (noting any that are to be retained or removed) and any proposed:

•  Landscaping and vegetation
•  Walls or fences
•  Signs (including sign design)
•  Utility services (e.g. water lines, street lights), which may also require details about connections to Three Waters infrastructure (including size, depth at boundary, grade and distance to boundary pegs)
Load​ing
Note
1. This may need to include features beyond the property boundary (e.g. utility services along the road frontage which may affect the desirable location of proposed vehicle accesses).
​xiii.Original and proposed future contours of the site with contours marked at 0.5m intervals.
​xiv.Nature and extent of any:​ 

​•  ​
Proposed earthworks (e.g. cut or fill, quantities) ​
•  ​
Designations affecting the site (refer Volume 1, Chapter 26: Designations
​​•  ​
Natural hazards (including hazard layers identified by the District Plan – refer Volume 1, Chapter 22: Natural Hazards and the Planning Maps)
No​te.
e) Eleva​tion drawings
El​evation drawings of all buildings to be constructed or altered, showing the relationship, design and appearance of proposed buildings, including:
​i.The natural ground level, and the nature and extent of any proposed earthworks (e.g. cut or fill, quantities).
​ii.Existing and finished ground levels.
​iii.Maximum building height and relevant height control plane angles.
​iv.Ground floor levels in relation to the top of the kerb at entry locations from any adjoining transport corridor.
i​v.Height above floor level of any upper-storey windows.
​v.Floor levels in relation to the depth of a 1% annual exceedance probability flood event.
​​Note
1. Tw​o copies at a scale of 1:50, 1:100 or 1:200, and one reduced A4 copy is required with any application.
f) Engineering design plans for any proposed infrastructure   
Eng​ineering design plans should be included for any proposed infrastructure.
Note
1. Guidance on engineering plan information requirements is contained within the Hamilton City Infrastructure Technical Specifications.
g) Other specialist information specifically required by the District Plan​  ​ ​ 
Th​is may include Integrated Transport Assessments, Acoustic Design Certificates, and Landscape and Planting Plans. Specific information required is referred to in the following Sections 1.2.2.
h)Other resource consents/permits
A description of whether any additional resource consents are required for the proposal and whether these have been applied for (e.g. Regional Council Discharge Permits, Regional Council Water Take Permit if the proposal is likely to involve a commercial or industrial-type activity that is likely to consume more than 15m3 of water per day).
i) Assessment of environmental effects
​i.An ass​essment of the environmental effects (AEE) of a proposal shall be provided with applications for resource consents. Any AEE shall be prepared in accordance with the Fourth Schedule of the Act and shall discuss all the actual and potential effects of the proposal on the environment.
​ii.The amount of detail provided must reflect the scale and nature of the effects. For example, if there are major effects arising from the proposal, a detailed analysis and discussion of these effects should be included. It may require the provision of information from a suitably qualified and experienced practitioner (e.g. a traffic engineer). If the effects of the proposal are small, then a less detailed AEE may be appropriate.
​iii.The AEE should identify how a​​​ny adverse environmental effects are to be avoided, remedied, or mitigated, and shall also ensure that the following matters are addressed.  

​​•  
Consultation undertaken with affected parties ​
•  ​
Effects of the proposal on the natural environment (including existing vegetation and natural land form), neighbourhood amenity, and infrastructure ​
•  ​
Heritage issues (such as waahi tapu) 
​•  ​
Site constraints (such as flooding) ​
•  ​
External impacts (such as discharges) 
​•
 ​Construction impacts (such as noise) ​​
•  
Other matters associated with the proposal
​​​iv.In the case of controlled and restricted discretionary activities the AEE need address only those matters which Council has retained control over or restricted its discretion to in the District Plan.

1.2.2 Add​itional Information Requirements

1.2.2.1 General

a)In addition to the information specified in 1.2.1 above, any other relevant plans, reports or information are to be provided with any application for a resource consent, to enable the full assessment and determination of the proposal, including:
​i.Details and outcomes of any consultation undertaken (e.g. Waikato iwi and local hapu, Kiwi Rail, Transpower, New Zealand Transport Agency, Heritage New Zealand, Waikato Regional Council).
​ii.Potential future subdivision of site.
​iii.How the proposal will promote any design guidance referenced in the District Plan.
​iv.Details about previous uses of the site and an assessment on whether the National Environmental Standard on Assessing and Managing Contaminants in Soil to Protect Human Health applies.
​v.Any other relevant rules or provisions in the District Plan, such as any overlay provisions and bonus provisions.
b)Re​ports and management plans demonstrating how adverse environmental effects associated with the proposed activity are to be avoided, remedied or mitigated with respect to:
​i.Nuisances such as noise, dust, odour, glare, and vibration.
​ii.Stormwater disposal and sediment control measures.​
​iii.​Hazardous facilities and substances.​
​iv.Discharges of contaminants.
Note
1. Historical and cultural sites and natural features are of significance to iwi and local hapu. In respect of any developments or activities requiring a resource consent, or for plan changes it is advisable that iwi representatives are notified at the earliest stages of planning. This will assist with the identification and mitigation of any potential adverse effects that may impact on cultural values. It is also advisable that before any archaeological surveys or investigations are undertaken iwi representatives are consulted.
2. It is recognised that traditional iwi/hapu customary processes are a complementary method of control outside the District Plan for activities that can adversely affect cultural values associated with natural features (such as the pollution of waterways that are used as important food-gathering sites). Customary processes may vary in different situations and could include:

 
Mauri – the notion of respect towards the health and wellbeing of significant sites
Rahui – an embargo or restriction on access to a site until it is lifted (usually in relation to a polluted or hazardous site)
3. Consultation with iwi can assist in identifying any appropriate customary processes to be followed where special tangata whenua values are identified.​

1.2.2.2 Subdiv​ision

a)General
Any subdivision application shall include plans, reports, and other information to show how the proposed allotments and access can adequately accommodate the development potential of the site. 
b)Scheme Plan
A Scheme Plan covering the following matters should be provided.
i.Unit site area of each proposed allotment.
​ii.Net site area of each proposed allotment.
​iii.Dimensions of all:

​​•  Existing boundaries
​​•  ​Proposed boundaries 
​iv.Shape factor shown on all proposed allotments, including those with existing buildings.
​v.Schedule of existing easements.
​vi.Memorandum and dimensions of proposed easements.
​vii.Existing and proposed land contours at 0.5m intervals and/or sufficient spot heights to allow accurate representation of the land surface.
​viii.Existing trees and other vegetation proposed for retention or removal.
​ix.All existing buildings (plan views of roof and wall outlines).
Note
1.  Documents should also be provided to show that existing buildings have been legally established.
​x.All proposed buildings and building platforms (including buildings being re-positioned on site).
​xi.Service areas, living areas, storage areas, vehicle parking areas and loading areas for all existing buildings.
​xii.Parking spaces (cars, motorbikes, bicycle, accessible) and loading spaces.
​xiii.Vehicle manoeuvring tracking curves.
​xiv.Vehicle queuing areas.
​xv.Distance of building eaves from abutting accessway or right-of-way boundaries.
​xvi.Vertical cross-section of building eaves/stairs/doors and windows that encroach accessway/right of way boundaries/unit title common areas.
​xvii.Existing and proposed Three Waters reticulation.
​xviii.All existing and proposed vehicle crossings.
​xix.Sight distances of all existing and proposed vehicle crossings.
​xx.Distance of all existing and proposed vehicle crossings from intersections or railway crossings.
​xxi.Distance between all existing and proposed vehicle crossings (including adjoining sites.
​xxii.Location of proposed roads, reserves, easements, and essential services.
​xxiii.Land to be vested in the Crown, Council, or network utility operator.
​xxiv.Nature and standard of existing and proposed roads and network utility services such as sewage disposal, stormwater management, water supply, telecommunications and electricity supply.
​xxv.Proposed final legal status (e.g. freehold, cross-lease, unit title).
Note
1. A checklist is provided by Council outlining all the information required with a subdivision application. Staged subdivisions should have each stage shown on a separate scheme plan, as well as a scheme plan showing the complete subdivision.​
c)Site Analysis
A site analysis shall be provided in such detail as corresponds with the scale and significance of the potential effects that the subdivision and any associated or subsequent development may have on the environment.

The site analysis shall identify, and where relevant provide detail of, how the proposed subdivision addresses (avoids, remedies or mitigates) adverse effects (on and or from), or where possible enhances (the values of):
​i.Topography and landforms, natural features, wetlands, springs and streams.
​ii.Existing native vegetation and significant trees.
​iii.Soils and groundwater.
​iv.Any significant views shafts
​v.Existing buildings and structures.
​vi.Heritage and cultural elements.
​vii.The road to be accessed and the surrounding transport networks.
​viii.Reserves, parks and open space.
​ix.Stormwater and wastewater systems, stormwater paths and any downstream capacity issues.
​x.Infrastructural capacity, performance and/or availability.
​xi.Any contamination issues.
​xii.Natural hazards.
​xiii.Impacts on community facilities.
​xiv.Surrounding character.
Note
1. All applications for subdivision are also required to provide a Water Impact Assessment as set out in 1.2.2.5 below or an Integrated Catchment Management Plan in accordance with, and where required by, Rule 25.13.4.1 in Volume 1.​
d)Sub​division Concept Plan
A Subdivision Concept Plan shall accompany subdivision applications for the following.​​

•  
Any single or staged subdivision creating more than 10 additional lots 
​​•  Any subdivision creating additional lots within Stage 1 of the Peacocke Structure Plan

The information provided as part of a Subdivision Concept Plan must demonstrate how the proposal meets, is consistent with, or otherwise satisfies:
​a)Objectives and Policies of:
i. The relevant zone
ii.​ Chapter 3: Structure Pl​ans
iii. Chapter 23 Subdivision​   
​b)Relevant standards
​c)Relevant design guides in Appendix 1.4 
A Subdivision Concept Plan is made up of the following components, which are described further below. 

​​•  Context Analysis
​​•  Plan 
Site Analysis
​​•  ​Plan 
Concept Plan
i)​ ​Con​text Analysis Plan
A context analysis plan identifies the constraints and opportunities within the wider site context (minimum 800m radius from the site); and helps to establish how development of the site either mitigates (constraints) or maximises (opportunities) these elements. The elements to be considered include but are not limited to:
​a)The ​wider transport network both existing and proposed, identified within the Structure Plan and Transport Corridor Hierarchy Plan (transport corridors, cycle and pedestrian routes).
​b)Opportunities to connect and integrate with adjacent transport networks.
​c)Existing and planned:
​i.Open spaces, parks, and green linkages.
​ii.Local centres, community facilities (e.g. schools, parks), passenger transport and direct routes to these.
​iii.Residential areas, surrounding subdivision lot density, housing typologies or styles, parks and networks.
​d)Existing infrastructure and reticulated services (including overhead transmission lines), available connections and capacity.
e)The form and scale of the built and natural environment.
​f)The amenity and character of the wider area.
​g)Notable natural (e.g. significant trees), heritage and cultural features.
​h)Landscape or landform features such as wetlands, streams, rivers, vegetation.
​i)Significant views and aspects.
ii)Site Analysis Plan
A detailed site analysis should be undertaken once the context analysis has been completed. The detailed analysis of the specific site and its close surroundings facilitates the design of appropriate subdivision responses.

A site analysis should be provided in such detail as corresponds with the scale and significance of the potential effects that the subdivision and any associated or subsequent development may have on the environment.

The site analysis should identify and, where relevant, provide detail of how the proposed subdivision addresses (avoids, remedies or mitigates) adverse effects (on and/or from), or where possible enhances (the values of) the following.
​a)Top​ography and landforms, natural features, wetlands, springs and streams.
​b)Existing native vegetation and significant trees.
c)​Soils and groundwater.
​d)Any existing and significant viewshafts.
​e)Existing buildings and structures.
​f)Heritage and cultural elements.
​g)The road to be accessed and the  surrounding transport network.
​​​h)Reserves, parks and open space.
​i)Stormwater and wastewater systems,  stormwater paths and any downstream capacity issues.
​j)Infrastructural capacity, performance and/or availability.
​k)Any contamination issues.
​l)Natural hazards.
​m)Impacts on community facilities.
​n)Surrounding character.
Note
1. All applications for subdivision are also required to provide a Water Impact Assessment as set out in 1.2.2.4 below or an Integrated Catchment Management Plan in accordance with, and where required by, Rule 25.13.4.1 in Volume 1.
iii)
Concept Plan
​The concept plan shall be prepared once the context and site analysis plans have been completed and there is a good understanding of the opportunities and constraints within the site and the wider neighbourhood.
​a)A subdivision concept plan shall specifically include the following information.
​i.The location and width of proposed roads and carriageways and the integration of the roads with the existing transport network.
​ii.The location and dimension of public reserves.
​iii.The location and dimension of shared-use pedestrian/cycle accessways.
​iv.The intended use of each lot in the subdivision and the ways in which the subdivision will integrate with all neighbouring sites either as already developed or as proposed in accordance with existing resource consents.
​b)In pr​eparing the concept plan the assessment criteria in Appendix 1.4.1.3 shall also be considered.
​c)Concept plans within the Peacocke Structure Plan Area shall be prepared in accordance with the neighbourhoods identified in Appendix 2.3.
​d)All concept plans shall be prepared by the applicant in consultation with Council officers as necessary and other stake holders prior to completing detailed subdivision proposals for the resource consent. Council officers shall use the concept plan to assess the subdivision application and will as necessary require compliance with concept plan for subdivision through conditions of consent and consent notices.

1.2.2.3 Master Plan for Peacocke Character Zone Neighbourhoods

A Master Plan shall accompany subdivision applications for in the Peacocke Character Zone for Fee Simple Subdivision where lots created are less than 2ha in the Terrace Area and less than 5000m² in the Gully and Hill Areas.

Master Plans shall be prepared in accordance with the neighbourhoods identified in Appendix 2-3 and the Peacocke Structure Plan (refer to Volume 1, Chapter 3: Structure Plans).

A Master Plan will also be required to include a Subdivision Concept Plan (refer to Appendix 1.2.2.2 d)), an analysis over all adjoining neighbourhoods to the subject site to ensure issues impacting on the development are understood and address the following matters​.

a) Transport Network
The Master Plan will need to outline the street pattern as well as set out the street typologies that will be used in the development, the pedestrian and cycle network and how this links with the City’s/area’s transport network and open space network. As part of the Master Plan a broad Integrated Transport Assessment will be required (refer to Rule 25.14.4.3).
​b)Infrastructure and Servicing
The Master Plan will need to identify the approach to the provision of infrastructure and services which is aligned with the structure plan and the wider city infrastructure development program. Incorporate a low impact urban design and development approach in association with the development of an Integrated Catchment Management Plan, as set out in Appendix 1.2.2.6, for the stormwater catchment area in which the Master Plan neighbourhood or neighbourhoods are located. Demonstrate the integration of any short term infrastructure solutions created under Rule 23.6.10(f) into the overall infrastructure solution for the Peacocke Structure Plan area as indentified by the Master Plan.
c)Natural Environment Network

The Master Plan will need to identify the natural and ecological systems within the area and demonstrate how these areas have been either integrated into the urban design or how they are to be protected. The integration of the natural environment into the urban form has strong links to how the open space system is developed and the establishment of the land use patterns.​​
d)Open Space Network
The Master Plan will need to demonstrate how the open space links with the natural environment, the Waikato River esplanade, the transport network, and land uses; how the pedestrian and cycle networks have been integrated into the open space network and river esplanade.
e)Land Use
The Master Plan will need to identify the location of commercial and community facilities as well as residential densities. It will need to also develop the street pattern taking into account the open space, natural environment and transport network. The street pattern will also need to take into consideration the development principles set out in the structure plan and the transport corridor hierarchies.
​f)Detailed Development Response
The approach proposed for the urban form of the neighbourhood will need to be developed. This will demonstrate the urban design and architectural responses to the opportunities and constraints within the neighbourhood and will need to consider the design guides set out in Appendices 1.4.11.4.2 and 1.4.3.
​g)Staging
​​The plan will need to identify the staging of development to demonstrate how any urban development created under Rule 23.6.10(f) is integrated into the overall master plan for the neighbourhood.

1.2.2.4 Landscaping Plan

All subdivision applications and any resource consent for development that has not complied with any landscaping and screening standards shall include, as part of the resource consent application, a Landscaping Plan in such detail as appropriate to the scale and significance of the potential effects that the activity may have on the environment. The Landscaping Plan shall contain as relevant: 

a)Site and property boundaries.
​​b)Transport corridors and public spaces such as parks and walkways adjacent to the site.
​c)The location of existing and proposed site features including buildings and structures, hard surfaces, retaining walls and fences, landforms, grassed areas and any other relevant features.
​d)Description of the location, size and species of existing and proposed vegetation.

​1.2.2.5 Water Impact Assessments

a) As part of an assessment of environmental effects a Water Impact Assessment will be required in accordance with Table 1.2.2.5a below:​

​Table 1.2.2.5a: Water Impact Assessments – Where required and what type

Where required
Type of Water Impact Assessment required
Except as provided for by Rule 25.13.4.6(b) in Volum​​e 1:

Any development or subdivision:

i. Failing to comply with relevant standards in Volume 1, Rule 25.13.4.5 Water efficiency measures.

ii. Failing to comply with any relevant permeable surface standards for the zone.

iii. Creating four or more residential units on any site. (excluding lots for the purpose of reserves, network utilities or transport corridors).

iv. Creating four or more additional allotments (excluding lots for the purpose of reserves, network utilities or transport corridors).

v. Involving more than 1ha of land

vi. Creating a new building for industrial activities with a gross floor area greater than 1000m2.

vii. Involving any new activity which will have a water requirement greater than 15m3 per day.

viii. Creating a new building for non-residential activities (other than industrial activities or as provided for in ix. below) with a gross floor area greater than 300m2.

ix.  ​Within the Major Facilities Zone:​

​​1.  Creating a new building for non-residential activities (other than industrial activities) with a gross floor area greater than 3,000 m2; or

2.  Providing residential accommodation for more than 13 additional people, not being accommodation for hospital patients.​
Type 1 (Residential activities)

b) The information required in a Water Impact Assessment shall be in such detail as appropriate to the scale and significance of the potential effects that the activity may have on the environment, and only if relevant to the proposal. Table 1.2.2.5b outlines the information requirements for the different types of Water Impact Assessments referenced in Table 1.2.2.5a above. 

Note
1. The extent and degree of assessment needed for a Water Impact Assessment may be greater when without an existing Integrated Catchment Management Plan.
2. As an outcome of the Water Impact Assessment, conditions may be applied to the development. These may include financial contributions, monitoring and the requirement for the installation of specific water sensitive techniques.

 
Table 1.2.2.5b: Information required for each type of Water Impact Assessment

Type of Water Impact Assessment and what information is to be provided
(✓​ = required)
Informatio​n to be provided
Type 1
2
i. 
​How the proposal is consistent with, or otherwise complies with, the recommendations, measures and targets of any relevant Integrated Catchment Management Plan.

​ii.​ An assessment of any p​otential effects (including cumulative effects) of the development in relation to its catchment.​​
​iii.​ Details of what water-sensitive techniques are proposed.​​ ​ ​




​​




 ​ ​
​iv. ​Details of the expected water efficiency benefits arising from the proposed water-sensitive techniques compared to the same development without using those water-sensitive techniques.
​v.​Details of how the water-sensitive techniques will be operated and maintained to ensure ongoing water efficiency benefits.​
​vi.​Where no water-sensitive techniques are proposed, an assessment containing reasons and justification for not incorporating water-sensitive techniques, having particular regard to the objectives and policies of the Volume 1, Chapter 25.13: City-wide – Three Waters.
​vii.Confirmation of available Three Waters infrastructure and capacity to appropriately service the proposal.​​​​
​viii.​Details of the water demand (flow and pressure) and water sources. ​​​​
​ix.​Where the water demand of the proposal is greater than 15m3 of water per day, details of a programme explaining how the proposal intends to reduce its water consumption to achieve that level.
Note
Consent from the Regional Council for an increased water take may be required where a proposal is to take in excess of 15m3 of water per day.​
​x.​Information on how wastewater (including trade waste) will be managed to minimise any impacts on the reticulated network.
xi.​​​A list of measureable targets and performance indicators to allow the efficient and effective monitoring of the proposal’s compliance with any conditions arising from the Water Impact Assessment.

1.2.2.6 Integrated Catchment Management Plans (ICMP)

All ICMPs shall be developed in consultation with Council and Waikato Regional Council and completed in accordance with the requirements set out below. Each ICMP shall be lodged with Council, and Council shall review the content of the ICMP and certify whether it complies with the requirements of this Rule set out below. 

There are three different types of ICMPs, which each have different information requirements – see Table 1.2.2.6a. 

Table 1.2.2.6a: Types of ICMPs and where to find their Information requirements ​   

Where to find the information requirements
Full ICMPTable 1.2.2.6b
Sub-catchment ICMP for Greenfield Areas See Note 1Table 1.2.2.6b
Sub-catchment ICMP for areas other than Greenfield AreasTable 1.2.2.6c

Note
1. Greenfield Areas include the Future Urban Zone, Temple View Zone, Te Rapa North Industrial Zone, Large Lot Residential Zone and all Structure Plan Areas identified in Appendix 2.

Table 1.2.2.6b: Information requirements for Full ICMPs and Sub-catchment ICMPs for Greenfield Areas

​a)​Maps/drawings identifying for the relevant hydrological catchment (or sub-catchment):
​i.​the catchment boundary;
(Note:  In the case of a full ICMP, this will be used in relation to determining future compliance with Rule 25.13.4.1(b));

ii.​Natural features, surface water bodies, existing drainage systems and infrastructure;​
​iii.Existing development and land uses (see f) vi below);
​iv.Proposed future development and land uses (see d) below); and
​v.The extent of the infrastructure networks that have been assessed and the location of any network constraints (see f) vii below).​
​b)Classification of the surface water bodies within the catchment (or sub-catchment) as detailed in the Waikato Regional Plan.
​c)The social, economic, ecological, amenity and cultural objectives being sought for the catchment (likely to stem from a structure planning process).
​d)A description of proposed urban growth, development and land use intensification within the catchment (or sub-catchment).
​e)A list of the key stakeholders associated with the catchment (or sub-catchment), details of the consultation undertaken, and details of their respective views on providing for new stormwater diversion and discharge activities with the catchment (or sub-catchment).
​f)An assessment of the current state of the catchment (or sub-catchment) and stormwater receiving environment/s, and the provision of catchment baseline information (including maps/drawings) on:
​i.Topography;

ii.Soils and geology; 

iii.Receiving environment –
a.Erosion; 
b.Ecology, including ecological sensitivity;


c​.Water quality (including contaminant load);​


d.Sediment quality; and


e​.Hydrology;
​iv.​​​ ​Hydrogeology
​v.Flooding (including overland flow paths);

vi.Existing development and land uses;

vii.Existing three waters infrastructure and water source(s), including their capacity to appropriately service the proposed urban growth, development and landuse intensification within the catchment (or sub-catchment); and

viii.All relevant existing resource use authorisations (including, for example, consents issued by the Waikato Regional Council for water take, wastewater and stormwater diversion and discharge activities).​
​g)The effects of climate change.
​h)An assessment of the environmental effects, including cumulative effects over time, of all proposed water take, wastewater management and stormwater diversion and discharge activities on the catchment (or sub-catchment) and stormwater receiving environment/s.  The assessment shall include maps/drawings and be in such detail as corresponds with the scale and significance of the effects on the catchment (or sub-catchment) including, but not limited to, effects on the following, taking into account the effects of climate change:
​i.Natural features, surface water bodies and aquifers, including water sources; 
​ii.Sites of cultural and/or historical significance; 
​iii.Public health; 
​iv.Flooding hazards, including overland flow; 
​v.Receiving water hydrology, including base flows and peak flows in rivers and streams and long-term aquifer levels; 
​vi.Receiving water sediment and water quality; 
​vii.Receiving water habitat, ecology and ecosystem health, including an explanation of how they will be maintained and enhanced;​
​viii.Receiving water riparian vegetation;
​ix.The extent and quality of open stream channels, including erosion and sedimentation;
​x.Fish passage for indigenous and trout fisheries (refer to the Waikato Regional Plan Water Management Classes for applicability);
​xi.The natural and amenity values of stormwater receiving waters, including the management of litter than becomes entrained in stormwater;
​xii.Existing infrastructure; and​
​xiii.Existing authorised resource use activities.
​i)In response to the environmental effects assessment, a description and assessment of the available options for managing the effects of all proposed water take, wastewater management and stormwater diversion and discharge activities within the catchment (or subcatchment).
​j)​​Identification of a recommended integrated catchment management approach that is based on the Best Practicable Option to avoid as far as practicable and otherwise minimise or offset actual and potential adverse effects of all proposed water take, wastewater management and stormwater diversion and discharge activities on the catchment (or sub-catchment) and its infrastructure, while ensuring the proposed urban growth, development and landuse intensification has an appropriate and sustainable water source and receives appropriate three-water services.
​k)Education initiatives to support the integrated catchment management approach
recommended in the ICMP. 
l) Maps/drawings, a description, and a prioritised schedule of the infrastructure works to be carried out to implement the integrated catchment management approach recommended in the ICMP.​ 
m) A list of performance measures by which the implementation of the integrated catchment management approach recommended in the ICMP will be gauged. 
n)The need for any changes (including designations) or variations to the relevant District Plan, as a result of the findings and approach of the ICMP.  
o)Identification of the water se​nsitive techniques that are appropriate, and those that are unsuitable, within the catchment or any sub-catchment. 
p)All ICMPs shall be of sufficient scope and detail to inform development of Water Impact Assessments. 
Note
1. Information requirements shaded in the table above do not apply to sub-catchment ICMPs for greenfield areas, but do apply to full ICMPs.
2. Council will hold some information and modelling data that may assist in preparing any type of ICMP. 
3.  Anyone preparing an ICMP will need to collaborate closely with Council.   Council’s guidance should be sought prior to commissioning any ICMP work.  Council will define appropriate methodologies and deliverables for the technical components of an ICMP and how the information and assessments are to be presented.  See also the Three Waters Management Practice Notes on Council’s website.
4.  Catchment boundaries will not always follow the boundary of a site. Some sites may fall within more than one hydrological catchment. Water supply, wastewater and stormwater networks often cross hydrological catchment boundaries.

Table 1.2.2.6c: Information requirements for Sub-catchment ICMPs for areas other than Greenfield Areas 

A Water Impact Assessment in accordance with Appendix 1.2.2.5 that also includes details of how adverse effects arising from the following will be avoided, remedied or mitigated:​ 
​a)Flood hazards;
b)Stormwater disposal;
c)Discharges of contaminants; and
d)Identified network constraints.​​ 

Table 1.2.2.6d: Completion of Full ICMP Preparation

Preparation of a full ICMP shall be considered complete when the ICMP has received technical certification by:​ 
​a)Council that the ICMP complies with the relevant information requirements; and​​
​b)Waikato Regional Council that the guidance within the ICMP for stormwater diversion and discharge activities is to an acceptable standard.​ 

​1.2.2.7 Historic Heritage – Schedule 8A and 8B Sites (Historic Heritage)

Any activity requiring a resource consent relating to Schedule 8A or 8B sites (refer Volume 2, Appendix 8) shall include as part of the resource consent application:

​a)Written advice from an appropriately qualified person or body concerning the effects of the proposed activity on the cultural and heritage values identified for the site and outlining possible mitigation measures. 
b)In the case of the site having identified tangata whenua values, advice from relevant iwi. 
​c)Where the site history indicates that there may be historical artefacts or other physical remains, advice from a suitably qualified and experienced archaeologist. 
​d)Advice that the necessary authority to modify or damage an archaeological site has been obtained from Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga under the Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga Act 2014.
Note
1. An archaeological assessment, advice from Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga, or consultation with iwi will not be required where there is documentary evidence held by Council that this has previously been carried out for the site, and that the proposed new work is covered by that documentary evidence.

1.2.2.8 Comprehensive Development Plan

a)​All CDP applications shall show the total expected development for the identified Comprehensive Development Plan area (even if the development is to proceed in stages) through plans and explanatory text. ​ 
​b)​Where a CDP area is to be developed in stages, the information required for each stage of the CDP process must be sufficient to enable assessment of the application in terms of the Concept Plan (Rototuna), Development Plan Area (Temple View), Structure Plan and the Urban Design Guide.
​c)Any staged application for the development of a CDP area shall include an overall development framework setting out the following for the entire CDP area:
i. Staging, 
ii.Main block pattern, 
iii.Roads and access ways, 
iv.Stormwater solutions, 
v.Reserves, and
vi.Bulk and scale of the buildings. 
The application for the development of a specific stage within a CDP area shall provide detailed information, including the design of urban spaces, buildings and their service infrastructure as set out in the table below.
​d)​For CDP applications in the Industrial Zone refer to Rule 9.3.3 and 9.3.4. 
​e)CDP applications (except those in the industrial zone) shall include where relevant, but not be limited to the following:​ 

Note
1.  Depending on the nature of the development and the stage it is at, not all information maybe required as part of the CDP.

Information Requirements
Rototuna Town Centre Zone
​Lake Waiwhakareke Natural Character Zone​Temple View Zone
All other CDPs (excluding Industrial Zone)
a) Demonstrating how the land-use pattern and features proposed in the relevant Structure Plan will be achieved.



b) Demonstrating via an urban design assessment how the proposed development is in general accordance with the relevant assessment criteria and design guide.


c) Demonstrating how the standards of the zone will be met and the extent to which the relevant assessment criteria is achieved.



d) Defining the exact boundaries between the precinct and adjoining precincts.

 
e) The method by which the development of each Comprehensive Development Plan Area is to be managed, and how it will relate to surrounding land, and the wider Structure Plan area.
 

​​​
f) The method by which the development of each precinct is to be managed, and how precincts will relate to each other, surrounding land and the wider Rototuna Town Centre area.

 
g) How transportation and other infrastructure is to be provided to enable the efficient, safe, effective, functional and sustainable delivery of infrastructure. This must take into account the subject Comprehensive Development Plan Area, integration with the surrounding CDP areas and the wider Structure Plan area.
 
​​​
h) How transportati​​on and other infrastructure is to be provided to enable the efficient, safe, effective, functional and sustainable delivery of infrastructure. This must take into account the subject Comprehensive Development Plan Area, integration with the surrounding CDP areas, the wider Rototuna Town Centre and the wider Structure Plan area.

 
i) Showing the exact location and design of proposed areas of open space, ecological links and natural features which are to be retained or enhanced, and the areas to be developed for stormwater purposes.



j) Site development. Illustrate:
 
 
i. Activity types

​​​
ii. Building footprints

​​
ii. Individual shop and business tenancy sizes

 
iv.  The number of residential units proposed


​​
v. External layout and floor areas of residential units


vi.  How the identified yield is to be met


vii. Pedestrian walkways and cycleways


viii. Carparking areas and vehicular circulation


​​
ix. Vehicular access points between the site and public roads


​​
x. Landscaping areas



xi.  Service areas with appropriate screening ​


​​
xii. Outdoor living courts
 
​​​
ii. Position of any existing buildings on adjacent land


​​
xiv. How the proposal integrates with adjacent properties in terms of contributing to an overall urban design and streetscape character including treatment of building frontages, and relationship between internal boundaries of Comprehensive Development Areas (e.g. glazing and orientation)
 

​​
xv. How the proposal integrates with adjacent properties in terms of contributing to an overall urban design and streetscape character including treatment of building frontages (e.g. glazing and orientation)

 
k) Development staging: Explain if the development of the Comprehensive Development Area is to be staged, the manner and proposed timeframes for the staging and the means of managing any vacant land during the staging process.


​​
l) Elevations. Illustrate:

i. Building height and orientation, building exterior design features, any balconies, any artificial lighting to exterior walls and features, and how the proposed development will integrate with adjacent properties in terms of overall urban design, streetscape character and amenity.


​​​
ii. Verandas

 
m) Signs. Give details on number, dimensions, location, content, means of support and attachment. This includes signs of the names of the residential development if applicable.



n) Transportation. Carry out an Integrated Transport Assessment (ITA) which addresses:

i. Provision for pedestrians, cyclists and passenger transport​

ii. Consistency with Access Hamilton and associated action plans

iii. On-site provision of car parking, servicing and manoeuvring space

iv. How car parking is to be provided, taking into account surrounding land uses and the opportunities for shared car parking

v. Safe and efficient provision of entry and exit, including safety for all road users

vi. Safe sight visibility distance for access points

 
vii. Safe separation of access points from intersections and other access points

viii. Impact of access on safe and efficient traffic flow on the transport network

ix. Imp​act on the capacity and performance of the transport network.



o) Possible transport and accessibility modelling to assist in the preparation of the ITA. Applicants must also demonstrate whether a Travel Plan is required to mitigate any transport impacts from the development.


​​
p) Servicing. Explain the provision, staging, location and capacity of network utilities and integration with existing and planned network utilities, quantity and quality of stormwater and proposed stormwater treatment, management and disposal facilities. Prepare an assessment of the impact on the infrastructure including network capacity and tolerance to support the development including future maintenance requirements.


​​​
q) Road Design. Provide details of:

 
i.  Form, function and design of internal roads including the integration with the existing transport network

 
ii.  Pavement and surfacing materials

iii. Location of parking areas

iv. Planting and street furniture

v.  Provision for pedestrians and cyclists

vi. Location of passenger transport facilities, including corridors or priority treatments

vii. Provision for road lighting

viii. Proposed speed limit and design speed

ix.  The location and concept design of the roads (including typologies).
 
​​
r) Pedestrian and Cycle Links. Provide details of the position of walkways and cycle ways, links to adjacent sites, consideration of passive surveillance and other CPTED principles, and any artificial lighting to be used within these areas.



s) Planting and Screening. Provide details of:
i. The type of landscaping to be established in yards, carparking areas, and other landscape areas

ii. Identification of the plant and tree species to be used

iii. Size of the vegetation

iv.  Number of plants to be used

v.  Artificial lighting or screening to be used

vi. Consideration of passive surveillance and other CPTED principles

vii. Maintenance provisions.

​​
t) Public Square: Show the type of landscaping and materials to be used, taking into consideration CPTED and lighting for safety, amenity and ambience. Consideration must be given to the multifunctional use of the square and its relationship with surrounding buildings and features.

 
u) Gateways: Show how the areas defined as gateways in the Rototuna Town Centre Design Guide will be treated in terms of opportunities for landmark buildings, structures, and public art to announce the sense of arrival and departure.

 
​v) ICMP:  Show how the development takes into account and addresses a completed and approved ICMP.​​​
w)   Demonstrate how the development of the CDP will integrate the identified heritage items found within the Temple View Zone ensuring the retention of the heritage values associated with these items.
​x)  Define the final location of CDP boundary between CDP Area 1 and CDP Area 2 taking the following into account:

•  ​ Impact on the heritage items located within the two CDP areas.

•   The ability to retain the identified character of the Temple View Zone.

•   Influences of topography and built form.

1.2.2.8a Temple View Precincts

​​a)​​ ​All applications for resource consent for activities within a Temple View Precinct shall show the total anticipated development for the Precinct area through plans and explanatory text, regardless of whether the application relates to all or part of the Precinct.  

Where an application for resource consent for activities within a Temple View Precinct relates to part of the Precinct, the level of information regarding anticipated development for the balance of the precinct area may be indicative but shall provide sufficient detail to demonstrate that the proposed development integrates with the existing development within the Precinct (where relevant) and the anticipated development for the entire Precinct area.

​b)​ ​Where a Temple View Precinct is to be developed in stages through the progressive lodgement of multiple resource consent applications, the information required for each stage of the Precinct process must be sufficient to enable assessment of the application against the purpose of the specific Precinct (in the context of the Character Area and/or the Heritage Area), and the Urban Design Guide.
​c)​ ​Notwithstanding a) and b) above, all applications for resource consent for the development of a Temple View Precinct shall include an overall development framework which sets out the following for the entire Precinct:
​i.​Staging, 
​ii.​Main block pattern,
​iii.​Roads and access ways,
iv.​​Stormwater Solutions,
​v.​Reserves, and 
​vi.​Bulk and scale of the buildings 
​ ​All applications for resource consent for activities within a Temple View Precinct shall provide, as a minimum, detailed information relating to the design of urban spaces, proposed buildings and service infrastructure for the proposed activities.
​d)​ ​In addition to the mandatory information requirements stated above any application for resource consent for activities within an identified Temple View Precinct shall include the information listed in the table below, where the information is identified for the specific Precinct.  
Note 
1. This information requirement applies to all resource consent applications for activities within a Precinct, whether the application relates to the entire Precinct or whether the application is for a particular stage of development within that Precinct.
2. Applicants may provide additional information where considered appropriate.
3. All applications for resource consent must also comply with the requirements of the Resource Management Act 1991, including Schedule 4.

 
​​Information Requirements​ ​​​​​​Temple View Zone ​ ​ ​ ​
​Precinct 1​Precinct 2​Precinct 3​Precinct 4​Precinct 5
​a) Demonstrate via an urban design assessment how the proposed development addresses the relevant assessment criteria and design guide.
​b) Demonstrate how the standards of the zone will be met and the extent to which the relevant assessment criteria is achieved. 
​c) Demonstrate how the proposed activities will integrate with the anticipated development for entire Precinct and the surrounding Precincts
​d) Demonstrate how infrastructure, including transportation links, will be provided which is safe, functional and sustainable; and which will integrate with development within the Precinct as well as surrounding Precincts.
e) Identify the location and design of proposed areas of open space, ecological links and natural features which are to be retained or enhanced, and the areas to be developed for stormwater purposes. 
​f) Details of the proposed development, including:
i.      Activity types 
​ii. Building footprints 
​iii. Individual shop and business tenancy sizes
​iv. The number of residential units 
​v. External layout and floor areas of residential units
​vi. Pedestrian walkways and cycleways
​vii. Carparking areas and vehicular circulation
​viii. Vehicular access points between the site and public roads 
​ix. Landscaping areas 
​x. Service areas with appropriate screening ​
​xii. Position of any existing buildings on adjacent land
​xiii. How the proposal integrates with adjacent properties in terms of contributing to an overall urban design and streetscape character including building frontages, and relationship between precinct boundaries (e.g. glazing and orientation)
g) Development staging: Explain if the development of the Precinct is to be staged, the manner and proposed timeframes for the staging and how any vacant land will be managed over time until all stages of the development are complete [where this is known and/or the Precinct land is owned by a single land owner or where a single enterprise has control over development across the entire Precinct]. 
​h) Building height and orientation, building exterior design features, any balconies, any artificial lighting to exterior walls and features, and how the proposed development will integrate with adjacent Precinct properties in terms of overall urban design, streetscape character and amenity. 
i) Signs. Give details on number, dimensions, location, content, means of support and attachment. This includes signs of the names of the residential development if applicable. 
​j) Transportation. : Require the preparation of an ITA as set out in Chapter 25, Rule 25.14.4.3
​o) Servicing. Explain the provision, staging, location and capacity of network utilities and their integration with existing and planned network utilities.  Provide details (to an appropriate level, commensurate with the nature and scale of the development), of the quantity and quality of stormwater; and any proposed stormwater treatment, management and disposal facilities. Provide an assessment of the impact on the infrastructure including network capacity and tolerance to support the development including future maintenance requirements.
l) Road Design. Provide details of:
i. Form, function and design of internal roads including the integration with the existing transport network 
ii. Pavement and surfacing materials 
iii. Location of parking areas 
iv. Planting and street furniture 
v. Provision for pedestrians and cyclists
vi. Location of passenger transport facilities, including corridors or priority treatments 
vii. Provision for road lighting
viii. Proposed speed limit and design speed
ix. The location and concept design of the roads (including typologies). 

 
​m) Pedestrian and Cycle Links. Provide details of the position of walkways and cycle ways, links to adjacent sites, consideration of passive surveillance and other CPTED principles, and any artificial lighting to be used within these areas. 
​n) Planting and Screening. Provide details of:
i. The type of landscaping to be established in yards, carparking areas, and other landscape areas
ii. Identification of the plant and tree species to be used 
iii. Size of the vegetation 
iv. Number of plants to be used 
v. Artificial lighting or screening to be used 
vi. Consideration of passive surveillance and other CPTED principles 
vii. Maintenance provisions.​
o)   Demonstrate how the development of the Precincts will integrate with the heritage items and Archaeological site within the Temple View Zone that are listed in Appendixc 8A and Appendix 8B to ensuring the retention of the heritage values associated with these items.

1.2.2.9 Flood Risk Assessment Report

Any application for subdivision consent creating additional lots within a Flood Hazard Area is to undertake a flood risk assessment report as outlined below.  

This report is a site specific flood assessment supporting proposed subdivision, use or development of land which may be affected by flooding. Its purpose is to provide information about the subject site, the proposed activity, the likelihood, nature and extent of the relevant flood hazard and an explanation as to whether the resulting level of flood risk is acceptable. It can be used to provide a more site specific assessment of flood hazards than the broad flood hazard categorisation identified on the Planning Maps and implemented by rules in Volume 1, Chapter 22: Natural Hazards.  

The flood hazard modelling information used by Council to identify Flood Hazard Areas should be used to inform this report​.

​a)The report must be prepared by an appropriately experienced and qualified practitioner and consider up to at least a 1% annual exceedance probability event. 
​b)The report must include, but may not be limited to, the following matters, where applicable. 
​i.The existing use and development of the site. 
​ii.An outline of the likelihood and effects of flooding on the site.  
​iii.A site layout plan showing: 

​​•  
Land potentially affected by flooding in a flood event, including areas of overland flow paths on the subject site and all adjoining sites. 
​​•  
The location of the proposed activity, including any proposed building platforms, in relation to the land potentially affected by flooding.
​iv.Whether there is a reasonable or practicable alternative to locating the proposed use or development on land within a Flood Hazard Area. 
​v.The sensitivity of the proposed activity to the adverse effects of flooding. 
​vi.The potential risk to life, health and safety, and property during a flood event including consideration of: ​​

•  
Frequency, duration, extent, depth and velocity of flooding on the site and any access to the proposed activity, ​​
•  
Cumulative risks from interactions with any other natural hazard affecting that site (e.g. geotechnical conditions), ​​
•  
Any available flood warning time, and 
​​•  
The ability to access or evacuate the site and the danger to residents and emergency service personnel if the site or access to the proposed activity is affected by flooding.
​vii.The positive or adverse effect of the proposed activity on:​ 
•  
Overland flow paths (e.g. obstructing or diverting), 
•  
Hydrological capacity (e.g. reduced flood water storage capacity),
•  
Flood water depths, and 
•  
Flood water velocities.
​viii.Whether the proposed activity creates a new or exacerbates an existing natural hazard both on or off site. 
​ix.Options to avoid or mitigate the adverse effects of flood hazards and reduce risk to the proposed activity to an acceptable level, including consideration of the appropriateness of any mitigation measures proposed. This may require:​  ​​

•  
An elevation plan showing freeboard heights in relation to the top water flood level of a 1% annual exceedance probability event. ​​
•  
Information confirming that the proposed design of sub-floor structures, walls or fences allows for the free passage of flood waters. 
​​•  
Information confirming that the design of proposed structures or buildings is sufficient to withstand inundation by flood waters.
​c)If the report relies on flood hazard modelling information other than that used by Council to identify the Flood Hazard Areas in the Planning Maps then the report must include detail about the model methodolo​gy, assumptions and limitations, validation and any peer review. 
​d)The report may recommend the refinement of the extent of the Flood Hazard Areas depicted in the Planning Maps to reflect a greater level of topographical detail than that used in Council’s flood hazard modelling. An explanation of the methodology used and the nature, extent and effect of the refinement is required. 
Note
1. R​ecommended refinements cannot alter the activity status of the proposal.

 1.2.2.10 Site Management Plan (Waikato Riverbank and Gully Hazard Area)

Any application for resource consent for subdivision, use or development within the Waikato Riverbank and Gully Hazard Area or any activity not complying with standards in Rule 20.4.1, must be accompanied by a Site Management Plan prepared by an appropriately experienced and qualified practitioner. This will include, but may not be limited to: 

​a)Location, extent and form of all existing and proposed: 
i. Buildings and structures.
ii.Landscaping (including retaining walls and fences).
ii​i.Sealed and impermeable ground surfaces.
​b)Existing and proposed site contours at 0.5m intervals. 
​c)Location, extent and species of: 
​i.Existing vegetation being removed. 
​ii.Existing vegetation being retained. 
​iii.Any proposed new vegetation. 
​d)​​The lo​cation of vehicle access, manoeuvring and parking areas.  
​e)The nature of the ground conditions and the suitability of the proposal having regard to these ground conditions. 
​f)Any risk mitigation measures proposed. 
​g)Land stability, erosion, earthquake (amplification and liquefaction) or any other natural hazard, including any modification to landforms and removal of vegetation. 
​h)Methods proposed for site management of earthworks and stormwater.​ 

In relation to Peat Lakes, Wetlands and Peat Lake Catchments: 

A description of the measures to be undertaken to help prevent or reduce effects on: 

 ​​•  Ecosystems, plants and animals any any disturbance of habitats
 ​​•  Any natural watercourse including any discharge of sediment to the waterway and any effect on water quality, water clarity and in-stream habitats. 

1.2.2.11 Stormwater Disposal Report

Any application for resource consent for subdivision, use or development within the Waikato Riverbank and Gully Hazard Area or any activity not complying with standards in Rule 20.4.1, must be accompanied by a Stormwater Disposal Report prepared by an appropriately experienced and qualified practitioner. This will include, but may not be limited to:​ ​   

​a)description of the site, including: 
​i.N​atural drainage patterns and any other drainage features (including any spring or groundwater seepage). 
​ii.Its relationship to broader stormwater catchments. 
​iii.Ground conditions and any particular geotechnical vulnerabilities. 
​b)Ex​isting stormwater consent constraints (if any) and whether these impact on the proposal. 
​c)An assessment of the wet season (winter) water table that establishes the minimum capacity of the ground to absorb water. 
​d)An assessment of post-development stormwater flows and the means to be employed to match these to predevelopment flows.

1.2.2.12 Hazardous Facilities

Any application for resource consent for Hazardous Facilities shall include as part of the resource consent application the following information.  

a)The proposed site and layout, with a description of the nature and scale of the proposed hazardous facility and associated operations.
​b)Quantities of hazardous substances proposed to be used, stored, transported or disposed of on the site.
​c)Site drainage and off-site infrastructure, including the biophysical characteristics of the site and surrounding areas (e.g. stormwater systems, transport corridors).
​d)Design and location of site access to provide safe access to and from the transport network.
​e)The sensitivity of the surrounding human, natural and physical environment and proposed measures to protect them. 
​f)Separation distances from neighbouring activities and people potentially at risk from the hazardous substance facility, including consideration of the proximity to people oriented activities (e.g. childcare facilities, hospitals, schools, rest homes). 
​g)Identification of on-site hazards and exposure pathways from the proposed facility, including a description of the environment actually or potentially affected by the proposal. 
​h)Potential cumulative effects with neighbouring facilities. ​​
​i)Preliminary hazard and risk assessment that systematically addresses the site hazards, likely accident scenarios, exposure pathways, receiving environments and potential environmental effects. 
​j)Management of wastes containing hazardous substances, including a waste management plan.
​k)Fire safety and fire water management. 
​l)Proposed contingency measures and emergency plans. 
​m)Proposed monitoring and maintenance schedules.​ 
​n)Risk assessment. For any activity that requires discretionary activity consent under Chapter 25.4 City-wide – Hazardous Facilities, the Assessment of Environmental Effects must contain a risk assessment that systematically addresses site hazards, likely accident scenarios, exposure pathways, receiving environments and potential environmental effects. The detailed hazard analysis and risk assessment of installations, operations and processes involving hazardous substances is to be appropriate to the type and scale of the proposed facility. For significant facilities a quantitative risk assessment may be required. This assessment should place emphasis on: 
​i.Identification of potential hazards, failure modes and exposure pathways; assessment of the probability and potential consequences of an accident leading to a release of a hazardous substance or loss of control, including, as applicable, cumulative or synergistic effects.
​ii.Acceptability of the assessed risks, including cumulative risks.
​iii.Residual risks after applying proposed risk control and mitigation measures. 
​o)Alternatives. For any activity that requires discretionary activity consent under Chapter 25.4 City-wide – Haza​rdous Facilities, the Assessment of Environmental Effects must also contain an evaluation of alternatives (sites or locations, substances, quantities, processes or equipment, site management, etc) to determine whether there are any alternatives to the proposal, particularly where it is possible that the activity is likely to result in significant environmental effects. 
​p)Risk mitigation and control. For any activity that requires discretionary activity consent under Chapter 25.4 C​ity-wide – Hazardous Facilities, the Assessment of Environmental Effects must clearly identify proposed risk control and mitigation measures, with emphasis on sensitive land-use activities and environments, including, as applicable: 
​i.Equipment, systems and engineered safety measures such as containment devices, fire safety apparatus and spill contingency or clean-up equipment. 
​​​ii.Emergency management plans, monitoring and maintenance schedules, and training programmes.​ 

1.2.2.13 Events

Any event requiring resource consent shall, as part of the resource consent application, provide a waste management plan, transport management plan and noise management plan prepared by suitably experienced and qualified practitioners, as outlined below:  

a)Waste Management Plan 
The Waste Management Plan shall outline: 
​i.An estimate of the types and volumes of waste to be generated by the event.  
ii.Any opportunities for waste minimisation. 
​iii.Steps to be taken to maximise the use and collection of recyclables or re-usable materials. 
​iv.Waste and recyclables collection, storage and transportation equipment to be provided. 
​v.The method of and person responsible for the collection and disposal of waste generated by the event. 
​vi.The arrangements made for the provision of post-event waste analysis and reporting of that information to the Council. 
​vii.The arrangements made for the provision of litter minimisation, collection, and removal from within the event site and its immediate surrounds. 
​b)Transport Management Plan  
The Transport Management Plan shall outline: 
​i)On and off street parking provisions. 
​ii)Travel plan including (but is not limited to):

i. Provision for access on and off the site for walking, cycling, passenger transport and the mobility impaired.​
ii.  Promotion of options for travel.
iii. Incentives for using passenger transport, walking or cycling.
iv.  Cycle-parking facilities.
v.   Map for ease of route planning.​    

​iii)A Temporary Traffic Management Plan prepared in accordance with the NZTA Code of Practice for Temporary Traffic Management. 
​iv)The outcome of consultation with NZTA, NZ Police, emergency services, directly affected residents/businesses and Waikato Regional Council (passenger transport), wherever relevant. 
​v)A contingency plan which specifies a clear set of roles and procedures in the case of a traffic accident or emergency. 
​c)The Noise Management Plan  
The Noise Management Plan shall outline: 
​i)Days and times of pre-event sound testing and practice, and of the main event.  
​ii)Identification of likely noise sources and the nature of noise emissions (including frequency of occurrence and duration and any special audible characteristics). 
​iii)The applicable noise performance standards.
​iv)Identification of likely affected persons and any special needs of those persons.
​v)Community consultation and notification of affected persons.
​vi)Mitigation measures, including for any pre-event sound testing and practice.
​vii)Monitoring of sound levels during the event to ensure compliance with the noise performance standards.
​viii)Complaints management procedure.
​ix)Contact details of key personnel.
x)Reporting of monitoring results to Council.

​1.2.2.14 Concept Development Consents for Major Facilities and Provision of Concept Plans

Any application for a Concept Development Consent for major facilities shall show the total expected development of the facility (even if the development in that area is to proceed in stages) through plans and explanatory text which may include the following information (as relevant).

a)How the proposal is in general accordance with the urban design approach objectives and policies in Volume 1, Chapter 25.15: City-wide – Urban Design.
​b)Demonstrate how the objectives, policies and rules in Volume 1, Chapter 17: Major Facilities Zone have been met.
​c)Demonstrate how the relevant assessment criteria have been met.
​d)Details of any consultation undertaken.
​e)A Concept Development Consent application shall include a concept plan which shows diagrammatically, in the form of precincts:
​i.The general distribution of activities, buildings, open space and parking facilities.
​ii.Provision for access to and movement within the site for vehicles.
​iii.Pedestrian and cycle links. Show the position of existing and proposed walkway and cycleway links within the site and to adjacent sites.
​iv.The interrelationships with the surrounding locality, including buffer areas, links to local centres and access to passenger transport.
​v.Future development areas, major landscaping areas and protected natural heritage and cultural features.
​vi.The parameters to which development in different areas will be subject, in terms of the general configuration and bulk of existing and proposed buildings.
​vii.Development Staging. Explain if development of the major facility is to be staged, the manner and proposed timeframes for the staging (if known) and the means of managing any vacant land during the staging process.
​​​viii.​​How Interface Areas on site are being appropriately planned for in the development of Concept Development Consents.
​ix.In the case of Waikato Stadium a shading diagram showing the extent and duration of shading resulting from new development proposals over any neighbouring properties.
​f)Any other information that may be needed to assess the application.
​g)New Concept Development Consent​s shall include a Broad ITA in accordance with Rule 25.14.4.3.

1.2.2.15 Waste Minimisation Plan

Any resource consent for any activity that fails the solid waste standard 25.12.3.1, or a service area or outdoor storage standard of the relevant zone, shall provide a Waste Minimisation Plan as part of the application. The waste minimisation plan shall identify:   

a)An estimate of the type and volume of waste to be generated.   
​b)Anopportunities for waste minimisation. 
​c)The steps to be taken to maximise the use and collection of recyclables or re-usable materials. 
​d)The waste and recyclables collection, storage and transportation equipment to be provided.​

1.2.2.16 Managed Care Facilities Information Pack

a)written information pack shall be provided. The information pack shall be prepared by the Agency/person(s) responsible for the managed care facility and include an overview of the Agency and the range of services provided (if relevant), and the type of care and programs to be provided within the managed care facility. The information pack shall include:
​i.Proposed number of residents.
​ii.The anticipated number of visitors to the site per week and daily visiting hours.
​iii.Anticipated full time equivalent staff at the facility.
​iv.Regular and emergency contact details to enable prompt and effective contact if necessary.
​v.The policies for the management of possible emergency situations including the management of neighbour relations in an emergency situation.
U​pon obtaining consent to establish the managed care facility, the Agency/person(s) responsible for the facility shall, within one calendar month of its occupancy, provide the written information pack to residents of the properties adjoining the site.  

1.2.2.17  Centre Assessment Report

a)Any applicant for a resource consent for office or retail activities shall provide a Centre Assessment Report as part of the application, excluding:  
​i.Ancillary retail and offices in all Business zones
​ii.Anretail activity in the Central City Zone 
​iii.Anoffice activity in the Central City Zone (Downtown Precinct) 
​iv.Yard based retail
​v.Building Improvement Centres
​vi.Wholesale and trade retail supplies
​vii.Anoffice or retail activity that is provided for in the Zone Activity Status Table as Permitted but requires resource consent due to failure to comply with one or more General Standard(s).  
​b)Purpose 
To address the potential effects associated with a proposal for retail or office activity in terms of the specified restricted discretionary activity criteria set out in Appendix 1 – clause 1.3.3H.    

The content and detail of the Centre Assessment Report shall correspond with the scale, nature and potential adverse effects of the proposal.  A detailed assessment may not be required if the applicant can clearly demonstrate that the proposed development is unlikely to have any significant effects in relation to the matters referred to above.  
​c)​Information requirements 
The information shall include:   
​i.A summary of the methodology and data sources used to prepare the assessment.
​ii.The following comparative indicators on the current vitality, functions and amenity of the Central City and sub-regional centres for the activity and a summary analysis of discernible trends:   ​​

•  Retail expenditure patterns​ ​​
•  
Floorspace and activity mix  ​​
•  
Employment by type ​​
•  
Pedestrian environment and flows ​​
•  
Parking and public transport services and connections ​​
•  
Retail and office demand and supply, including vacancy levels. 

​iii.The existing and consented development located outside of the Central City and/or sub-regional centres  which has been taken into account when assessing the potential adverse effects of the development. 
​iv.Any external non-development factors such as macroeconomic trends or site specific factors that could influence the above indicators.
​v.Information should be included to demonstrate the appropriateness of the timeframes used to demonstrate trends and future predictions.

​1.2.2.18 ​​Ruakura Logistics Zone ​

a)Applications for Freight-handling activities and Logistics and Freight-handling infrastructure within the Inland Port (Sub Area A (Inland Port)), see Figure 2-14, shall be accompanied by a Noise and Vibration Management Plan for the relevant stage of the Inland Port which shall include the following:
i.The result of any noise monitoring undertaken to demonstrate that earlier stages of Inland Port development and logistics activities, if any, meet noise performance standards, with an analysis of compliance as necessary.
ii.A recalibrated model based on the results of the above monitoring.
iii.The identification of construction and operational noise and vibration sources and the noise emissions associated with each stage of the development of the Inland Port (Sub Area A (Inland Port)), including refrigerated containers.
iv.The applicable noise performance standards to be achieved at different times of the day.
v.The applicable vibration performance standards.
vi.Operational strategies and configurations adopted for each stage based on modelling which achieve compliance with the noise and vibration performance standards set out in Chapter 25.8.
vii.Plans and diagrams sufficient to illustrate the location, scale and dimensions of the noise barrier designed to achieve compliance with the noise performance standards set out in Chapter 25.8.
vii.Strategies and configurations to be adopted during construction which achieve compliance with the noise and vibration performance standards set out in Chapter 25.8.
ix.A signed statement by its author stating that the measures identified will enable the activity to comply with the noise and vibration performance standards set out in Chapter 25.8.
x.A subsequent signed statement by the designer of the noise barrier that it has been constructed in a way that makes it fit for purpose.
xi.Identification of persons potentially affected by noise and vibration from the operation and construction of the Inland Port (Sub Area A (Inland Port)) (including but not limited to members of the Inland Port Community Liaison Committee required under Rule 10.5.1), a record of meetings held and consultation undertaken with such potentially affected persons, and responses to matters raised in consultation.  
xii.Procedures for monitoring noise levels to ensure compliance with the noise performance standards in Chapter 25.8.
xiii.Management of noise emissions at night, with particular emphasis on the methods to effectively manage the noise effects on noise sensitive activities and which avoid or minimise sudden and/or loud noises at night.
xiv.
Procedures for receiving and addressing noise complaints.
xv.
Methods for updating the Noise and Vibration Management Plan as appropriate to respond to changing requirements.
xvi.
Contact details of key personnel, including the name of the person with overall responsibility for ensuring noise limits are met.
xvii.
An independent peer review report prepared by a suitably qualified and experienced expert acceptable to the Council that considers all aspects of the Noise and Vibration Management Plan, in particular the accuracy of modelling, the matters of discretion listed in Appendix 1.3.3 N2 Ruakura   and compliance with noise and vibration performance standards.

1.2.2.19 Knowledge Zone Precinct C

1.2.2.19.1 Centre Assessment Report

a)
Purpose
To address the potential effects associated with a proposal for retail, office and other activities in terms of the specified restricted discretionary activity criteria set out in Appendix 1.3.3 N Ruakura.

 
The content and detail of the Centre Assessment Report shall correspond with the scale, nature and potential adverse effects of the proposal.  A detailed assessment may not be required if the applicant can clearly demonstrate that the proposed development is unlikely to have any significant effects in relation to the matters referred to above. 
b)
Information requirements
The assessment shall include the following information:
i.A summary of the methodology and data sources used to prepare the assessment.
ii.
The following comparative indicators on the current vitality, functions and amenity of the Central City and sub-regional centres for the activity and a summary analysis of discernible trends: 
Retail expenditure patterns
Floorspace and activity mix
Employment by type
Pedestrian environment and flows 
Parking and public transport services and connections 
Retail and office demand and supply, including vacancy levels
iii.The existing and consented development located outside of the Central City and/or subregional centres, which has been taken into account when assessing the potential adverse effects of the development.
iv.Any external non-development factors such as macroeconomic trends or site specific factors that could influence the above indicators.
v.Information should be included to demonstrate the appropriateness of the timeframes used to demonstrate trends and future predictions.​

1.2.2.20 Land Development Plans

Land Development Consent

 
An application under Rule 3.7.4.2 shall be accompanied by a Land Development Plan including the following information:
General 
a)The exact boundaries between the Land Development Plan and adjoining Land Development Plan Areas.
b)The exact boundaries of any Open Space Zone included in the Land Development Plan.​
​c)Where an application for Land Development Consent is made for part of a Land Development Plan Area (as shown on Figure 2-16), pursuant to rule 3.7.4.2b) the following indicative information for the balance area of each Land Development Plan Areas shall be provided as part of that application:
​i.​The location and width of proposed roads and carriageways and their integration with the existing and future transport networks;
​ii.​The location of proposed Ruakura Strategic Infrastructure to ensure connectivity across the entire structure plan and adjacent Land Development Plan areas;
​iii.​The National Grid electricity transmission network;
​iv.​Where the Land Development Plan contains any part of the Inland Port (Sub Area A (Inland Port)) an indicative layout plan showing internal roads, hardstand and impermeable areas, crossing points under transmission lines, indicative building locations, future rail sidings and connections to the East Coast Main Trunk railway and clearances between finished surface levels of the Inland Port and the National Grid electricity transmission network;
​v.​The location and size of storm water treatment and control measures; and
​vi.​The location, size and purpose of open spaces.
Concept Layout Plan ​
d)The location, width and design of proposed roads and carriageways (including lighting, street furniture and signs) and the integration of roads with the existing and future transport network and the National Grid electricity transmission network.
e)The location of proposed Ruakura Strategic Infrastructure to ensure connectivity across the entire structure plan and adjacent land development plan areas. 
f)Within the Inland Port (Sub Area A (Inland Port)) – an indicative layout plan showing internal roads, hardstand and impermeable areas, crossing points under transmission lines, indicative building locations, future rail sidings and connections to the East Coast Main Trunk Railway and clearances between finished surface levels of the Inland Port and the National Grid electricity transmission network.
g)The location and design of storm water treatment and control measures.
h)
The location and dimension of open spaces, and the total area provided for each open space purpose consistent with the purpose of the Ruakura Open Space Zone and Ruakura Structure Plan area. 
i)The location and dimension of pedestrian and cycle ways.
j)Existing and proposed Three Waters infrastructure necessary to service the Land Development Area. 
k)Existing and proposed ground levels and associated earthworks (Note: consent for earthworks within a National Grid Yard may also be required under Rule 25.2.3 or 25.7.4). 
l)Methods to provide public access to and use of the Open Space, except as may need to be limited for safety reasons.
m)
Consistency with the overall strategic infrastructure network for the structure plan as shown on Figures 2-15A and B Ruakura Strategic Infrastruture (Appendix 2).
​ ​Landscape Concept and Ecological Enhancement Plan​
n)A Landscape Concept and Ecological Enhancement Plan that includes the following:
i.A landscape concept for the area of open space included in the Land Development Plan, consistent with the purpose of the Ruakura Open Space Zone and Ruakura Structure Plan area. 
ii.Details of landscape treatment of streets, footpaths and cycleways.
iii.Details of landscape treatment of storage basins, swales and linear wetlands, which show at a minimum the following:
a.100% cover of indigenous wetland vegetation in linear wetlands associated with arterial, collector roads and local roads in Industrial Park Zone; and
b.80% cover of indigenous wetland vegetation in linear wetlands associated with the main greenway corridor, including the Silverdale Road to Mangaonua greenway and the corridor adjoining the expressway in the Logistics and Industrial Park Zones.
iv.iv. Details of the Landscape Buffer Areas in the Inland Port (Sub Area A (Inland Port)) required in Rule 10.5 and as shown on Figure 2-17 Inland Port Building Setbacks and Landscape Controls (Appendix 2).  These details shall include:
a.Measures to ensure that filled ground provides optimum growing conditions such as avoiding the placement of compacted fill and installing topsoil that has been stripped and stockpiled according to sound practice.
b.Plant types and species, sizes at time of planting and spacing sufficient to achieve the screening purpose of the buffer areas.
c.The selection of quick growing trees that are capable of achieving the planting heights (other than understorey and edge planting) specified on Figure 2-17 Inland Port Building Setbacks and Landscape Controls (Appendix 2) according to the following growth rates:​
- Year 1 = 2m
- Year 5 = 6m-8m
- Year 8 = 8m-10m
- Year 10 = 10m-12m
d.Details of ongoing maintenance to ensure the planting achieves the best possible growth rates.
v.Details of the Landscape Buffer Areas for Percival Road required under Rules 10.5.4.3 and 11.5.3 and as shown on Figures 10.5.4.3a and 11.5.3a. These details shall include those as outlined in iv a), b) and d) above. 
​vi.​Measures to ensure the implementation and ongoing maintenance of the Landscape and Ecological Concept Plan. In particular, the Landscape and Ecological Concept Plan shall detail the proposed timeframes for the implementation of the planting in the Landscape Buffer Areas in the Inland Port (Sub Area A (Inland Port)) relative to the proposed development and operation of logistics and freight-handling activities and infrastructure. 
vii.
A design statement, and details of plant species1 and materials including indigenous trees and shrubs bordering the linear wetland to improve the ecological function without hindering their treatment functions.
1 Note: 
On the basis of the soil type within the storage basin to be planted, shrubland and forest species shall be selected from Clarkson B D, Clarkson B R and Downs T M, 2005: Indigenous Vegetation Types of Hamilton Ecological District, CBER Contract Report 58. The percentage vegetation cover of the storage basins shall be consistent with Hamilton City Council Infrastructure Technical Specifications October 2013 or its replacement.  
viii.Methods in the design and layout of Open Space to provide for the amenity of adjoining and adjacent activities.
ix.The design of the linear wetlands to support black mudfish, shortfin eels and longfin eels, including a range of vegetation suitable to support these fish species without hindering the treatment functions of the linear wetland. The design shall take account of risk factors for black mudfish including competition from pest fish, lack of suitable peat soils, drying out, lack of cavities for mudfish to aestivate (sleep over summer) and inappropriate pH of water due to lack of peat. This may necessitate retention or incorporation of peat soils in the construction of the linear wetlands.
x.Methods to ensure implementation of a Native Fish Management Plan for the Land Development Plan Area consistent with the requirements of the Structure Plan Area-wide Native Fish Management Plan.  
xi.Methods to ensure implementation of a Native Lizard Management Plan for the Land Development Plan Area consistent with the requirements of the Structure Plan Area-wide Native Lizard Management Plan.
xii.xii. The Native Fish Management Plan and Native Lizard Management Plan prepared by suitably qualified and experienced ecologist and shall include:
a.containment and translocation methods for at risk species;
b.methods to ensure adequate separation between black mudfish and longfin eels;
c.adaptive management, monitoring and response process to determine the success or otherwise and to implement a contingency plan if necessary; and
d.an analysis of risk relating to timing of collection, containment and translocation.​
Water Impact Assessment
o)A Water Impact Assessment based on anticipated development in the Land Development Plan that includes the following:
i.How the proposal is consistent with, or otherwise complies with, the recommendations, measures and targets of any relevant Integrated Catchment Management Plan.
ii.Where there is no relevant Integrated Catchment Management Plan, how the proposal is consistent with the development of and gives effect to Ruakura Strategic Infrastructure including as shown on Figures 2-15A and B Ruakura Strategic Infrastructure (Appendix 2) for the entire structure plan area. 
iii.How the Land Development Plan provides for the eventual diversion of any temporary connections to strategic infrastructure, including timing or triggers for such diversions. 
iv.An assessment of any potential effects (including cumulative effects) of the development in relation to its catchment. In particular, the assessment should include consideration of potential construction effects and the potential effects of new stormwater devices on adjacent private property. 
v.Details of what water-sensitive techniques are proposed and methods of implementation.
vi.Details of the expected water efficiency benefits arising from the proposed water-sensitive techniques compared to the same development without using those water-sensitive techniques.
vii.Details of how the water-sensitive techniques will be operated and maintained to ensure ongoing water efficiency benefits.
viii.Confirmation of available Three Waters infrastructure and capacity, existing and proposed, to appropriately service anticipated development in the Land Development Plan area and the wider structure plan area.
ix.Details of the water demand (flow and pressure) and water sources.
x.
An assessment of the effect that any staged or interim development and infrastructure has on the strategic network described in Figures 2-15A and B Ruakura Strategic Infrastructure (Appendix 2) including an assessment of when any diversion to that strategic network is required to restore the city wide network capacity that was being used on an interim basis.

 
​Note: 
Consent from the Regional Council for an increased water take may be required where a development proposal is to take in excess of 15m3 of water per day.

 

Integrated Transport Assessment
p)An Integrated Transport Assessment (ITA) for anticipated development within the Land Development Plan area, prepared in accordance with the requirements of Rule 25.14.4.3 and confirming that the anticipated levels of development will comply with Rule 3.7.4.3 Staging and Traffic Requirements. Prior to approving an ITA or Land Development Plan for the first stage of the Inland Port (Sub Area A (Inland Port)), the upgrading requirements of Ruakura Road from, and including, the Silverdale Road intersection to Wairere Drive shall be reviewed. Any upgrading required shall be agreed with the Hamilton City Council, and be completed in accordance with the agreement before operation of the Inland Port (Sub Area A (Inland Port)) or other development commences. 
q)Details of how the Land Development Plan has been designed to align with the Cyclist and Pedestrian Network Plan in Figure 2-18 Ruakura Cyclist and Pedestrian Network Plan in (Appendix 2), including the grade separation of facilities on arterial routes.
r)
Details of any proposed crossing of the East Coast Main Trunk Railway by the Spine Road, which show how it will be grade-separated.
​Mitigatio​n of Adverse Land Development Effects on Habitats
s)Details of how land development avoids, remedies or mitigates adverse effects on, or where possible enhances, any significant habitats of indigenous fauna.
Medium Density Residential Zone
t)The layout of roads, public spaces and lots, showing how compliance with a minimum net density of 16 dwellings per hectare will be achieved.
u)The specific location and extent of the Integrated Retail Development consistent with that shown on Figure 2-14 Ruakura Structure Plan – Land use (Appendix 2).
​Open Space Provisions​
The following components of the open space network are to be considered when developing a Land Development Plan to ensure the various functions are not compromised. The Land Development Plan shall demonstrate the maintenance and development of:
v)Greenway - In addition to the stormwater management function, the greenway shall create opportunities for improved habitat and ecological benefits in the Ruakura Structure Plan area and in downstream receiving environments. 
w)Gullies - Layout of the residential area is to been designed to provide opportunities for the restoration and enhancement of the Kirikiriroa Stream headwaters.
x)Visual amenity and buffer between incompatible activities – in particular the following open space areas identified on the Ruakura Structure Plan are intended to provide a buffer function: (See Figure 2.14 Ruakura Structure Plan – Land use (Appendix 2))


The greenway;

The area to the north of the proposed Ruakura Industrial Park Zone that adjoins the General Residential Zone;
​•​The transmission corridor between Ruakura Road and the Knowledge Zone;​

The area between the realigned Ruakura Road and Silverdale Road, and between the Ruakura Industrial Park Zone and the existing General Residential Zone to the south;

The area between the logistics and industrial activities, and the residential neighbourhoods in Silverdale and the University of Waikato.
​•​The area between Fairview Downs residential area and the Spine Road.
y)Neighbourhood reserves – these will be required as part of the subdivision process and the establishment of residential neighbourhoods. As such the location of the neighbourhood reserves on Figure 2-14 Ruakura Structure Plan – Land use (Appendix 2) is indicative only. Each neighbourhood reserve shall be an area of approximately 0.5ha and serve a catchment area of approximately 500m radius. Neighbourhood reserves complement the range of facilities provided by the Ruakura Open Space Zone and provide a focal point for, and contribute to the visual amenity of the local community.
z)y) Connectivity – a concept layout plan at Land Development Plan stage will show the location and dimension of pedestrian and cycle ways in accordance with Figure 2-18 Cyclist and Pedestrian Network Plan (Appendix 2) as well as the landscape treatment of streets, footpaths and cycleways. 

​​ ​Ruakura Strategic Infrastructure (as shown on Figures 2-15A and B)
aa)​Consistency with Figures 2-15A and B Ruakura Strategic Infrastructure (Appendix 2) 3.7.2.6 Connections to Ruakura Strategic Infrastructure and 3.7.4.4 Ruakura Strategic Infrastructure Rules, where relevant. 


1.2.2.21 Staging and Traffic Requirements
a)The application shall be accompanied by an Integrated Transport Assessment (ITA) prepared in accordance with Rule 25.14.4.3.
b)All ITAs required shall be prepared by suitably qualified professionals and should generally follow the approach and guidelines of New Zealand Transport Agency’s “Research Report 422: Integrated Transport Assessment Guidelines, November 2010”, or its replacement. 

1.2.2.22 Concept Plan Consent for Knowledge Zone (excluding Precinct C)​

Any application for a Concept Plan Consent for Precinct A, B or D in the Knowledge Zone shall show the total expected development of the facility (even if the development in that area is to proceed in stages) through plans and explanatory text which may include the following information (as relevant).
a)How the proposal is in general accordance with the urban design approach objectives and policies in Volume 1, Chapter 25.15: City-wide – Urban Design.
b)Demonstrate how the objectives, policies and rules in Volume 1, Chapter 8: Knowledge Zone have been met. 
c)Demonstrate how the relevant assessment criteria have been met.
d)Details of any consultation undertaken.
e)A Concept Plan shall be provided as part of a Concept Plan Consent that shows diagrammatically, in the form of sub areas:
i.The general distribution of activities, buildings, open space and parking facilities.
ii.Provision for access to and movement within the site for vehicles.
iii.Pedestrian and cycle links. Show the position of existing and proposed walkway and cycleway links within the site and to adjacent sites.
iv.The interrelationships with the surrounding locality, including buffer areas, links to local centres and access to passenger transport.
​v.Future development areas, major landscaping areas and protected natural heritage and cultural features.
vi.The parameters to which development in different areas will be subject, in terms of the general configuration and bulk of existing and proposed buildings.
vii.Development Staging. Explain if development of the precinct is to be staged, the manner and proposed timeframes for the staging (if known) and the means of managing any vacant land during the staging process.
viii.How Interface Areas on site are being appropriately planned for in the development of Concept Plans as part of a Concept Plan Consent.
f)Any other information that may be needed to assess the application.
g)New Concept Plan Consents shall include a Broad ITA in accordance with Rule 25.14.4.3.

​​​Note
A Concept Plan Consent may include a condition which requires the consent holder to submit a detailed building design, prior to construction commencing. This is to ensure quality outcomes for the Knowledge Zone in circumstances where a CPC identifies building envelopes. The matters which may be required to be addressed will be based on Assessment Criteria B – Design and Layout in Appendix 1.3.3.   ​

1.2.2.23 Land Development Consent - Te Awa Lakes Medium Density Residential Zone

​An application under Rule 4.5.6 c) shall be accompanied by a Land Development Plan including the following information. All information shall demonstrate consistency with the Te Awa Lakes Structure Plan.
​a)​The boundaries between the Land Development Plan and adjoining Land Development Plan Areas.
b)​The boundaries of any Open Space Zone included in the Land Development Plan.
​c)​Where an application for Land Development Consent is made for part of a Land Development Plan Area (as shown on Figure 2-20) pursuant to Rule 4.5.6 b), the following indicative information for the balance area of each Land Development Plan Areas shall be provided as part of that application:
i.​The location of proposed roads and their integration with the existing and future transport networks
ii.​​The location and size of stormwater treatment and control measures
iii.​The location, size and purpose of open spaces
​d)​The location, width and design of proposed roads and carriageways (including lighting, street furniture and signs) and the integration of roads with the existing and future transport network.
​e)​The location and design of stormwater treatment and control measures.
​f)​The location and dimension of open spaces, including any neighbourhood reserves, and including esplanade reserves, consistent with the purposes of the Natural Open Space Zone and the Te Awa Lakes Structure Plan.
​g)​The location and dimensions of pedestrian and cycleways.
​h)​Existing and proposed Three Waters infrastructure necessary to service the Land Development Plan Area and in accordance with any approved Integrated Catchment Management Plan or Subcatchment Integrated Catchment Management Plan.
​i)​Existing and proposed ground levels and associated earthworks.
​j)​A landscape concept plan incorporating an indigenous landscape plan that includes:
​i.​A landscape concept for any areas of open space, including neighbourhood reserves and esplanade reserves.
ii.​​Details of landscape treatment of streets, footpaths and cycleways.
iii.​Details of landscape treatment of stormwater swales, wetlands, detention basins and lake edges.
iv.​​Details of landscape treatment to provide a buffer adjacent to the Waikato Expressway.
​v.​Details of plant types and species and sizes at time of planting, including ecosourcing of plants from within the Waikato Basin and choice of species that reflect the history of the area.
​vi.​Details of ongoing maintenance to ensure the planting achieves the best possible growth rates.
vii.​Use of indigenous plant species and landscape design that reflect cultural perspectives.
k)​​An Ecological Rehabilitation Management Plan (ERMP) that includes the following, and the methods to implement them:
​i.​An indigenous fish management plan, including a summary of fish habitat and species present, a summary of planned works, permitting requirements, procedures for dealing with pest fish, biosecurity protocols, timing of works, procedures for recovering indigenous fish prior to and during works, roles and responsibilities of parties, reporting requirements and any specific mitigation measures.
​ii.​Planting of trees for bat habitat, including tall tree species such as Kahikatea and Totara, in areas where bat habitat utilisation is likely to be high.
​iii.​Lighting design that is sensitive to bat habitat including minimal lighting in areas close to the Waikato River, avoidance of upward facing lighting and UV lighting, and avoidance of lighting in wetland and riparian margin areas.
iv.​​Restoration planting to include wetland restoration, habitat enhancement and riparian buffer zones.
v.​​Provision of passage into the recreational lake for indigenous fish if practicable, while excluding exotic pest fish species.
​vi.​Recreational lake bathymetry that is sufficient to help reduce wind-driven sediment resuspension and excessive growth of nuisance weeds.
vii.​Incorporating diversity into recreational lake shore habitat including built areas, wetland plants and beach areas.
viii.​Ensuring sufficient water flow through the lake or other methods to maintain high water quality having particular regard to avoidance of nuisance phytoplankton blooms.
​ix.​Ensuring new stream habitat mimics natural systems.
​x.​A specific ecological rehabilitation plan to restore and enhance the unnamed tributary to the Waikato River that is the southern stormwater outlet of the site. The stream runs through the adjacent Lot 1 DPS 57602 and Part Lot 1 DPS 11080, and the plan is to apply to its full length and incorporate as a minimum:
  • Creation of a diverse and variable habitat and channel complexity over time to allow for differences in flow velocities.
  • Provision of vegetative cover, woody debris or other in-stream structures.
  • Fish passage by way of lined ramp or similar to enable native climbing species.
  • A meandering channel.
  • Creation of pool-riffle-run sequences.
  • Proposals for ongoing maintenance and management.
  • Avoidance of instream works during peak fish migration periods (August-December)
​l)​Within 200m of the Waikato Expressway carriageway, the layout of roads and lots to generally achieve orientation of noise sensitive spaces in buildings away from the Expressway.
m)​A Water Impact Assessment that demonstrates how the proposal is consistent with the recommendations, measures and targets of the relevant Integrated Catchment Management Plan or Subcatchment Integrated Catchment Management Plan.
​n)​A management plan for the main linear lake that includes:
  • a monitoring plan of stormwater inflows to provide sufficient data to adaptively manage the lake to meet a swimmable standard and trophic state
  • a series of triggers and actions to maintain the lake to a swimmable standard and trophic state
​o)​The layout of roads, public spaces and lots, showing how the dwelling unit yields in Rule 4.6.2 b) will be achieved.
​​p)​Building envelopes to demonstrate the suitability of any lots intended for duplex or apartment development.
q)An Integrated Transport Assessment for anticipated development within the LDP area, prepared in accordance with the requirements of Rule 25.14.4.3 and assessing the levels of traffic generation against the traffic generation threshold and associated mitigation measures described in clause 3.8.3 in section 3.8, Te Awa Lakes Structure Plan.
Page reviewed: 08 Apr 2019 8:10am