5.2 Objectives and Policies: Special Character Zones

​​All Special Character Zones

​Objective Policies​
5.2.1
The Special Character Zones retain and enhance their identified values.​
​ ​ ​ ​
5.2.1a
Cumulative adverse effects on the character of the area are avoided wherever practicable.​
5.2.1b​
Development is consistent with the reasons for the site being included within a Special Character Zone.​
5.2.1c
The size and scale of buildings and structures is compatible with the amenity of the locality.​
5.2.1d
Buildings are designed so they do not physically dominate or adversely affect the residential character of the neighbourhood.​
5.2.1e
Significant vegetation and trees should be preserved.​
5.2.1f
New urban development in the Peacocke Structure Plan area should demonstrate consistency with the urban design guide for the development and create residential and commercial areas of high amenity that respond positively to the areas's natural environment.
​5.2.1g
Urban development in the Rototuna North East Character Zone maintains the natural pattern of the area’s landforms as a key feature of residential development along with ensuring that development retains upper hill slope as legible features of the area’s skyline.

Explanation

All the areas which have been identified as Special Character Zones have particular features which make them unique within the City. It is important that these unique features are identified and any new development does not harm these characteristics.

For the Peacocke Character Zone new development will result in a change in character from rural to urban. The resulting urban development will need to achieve the vision for the Peacocke area which is to create a high quality urban environment that is based on urban design best practice, social well-being and environmental responsibility. 

The landscape feature of the north eastern area of Rototuna is locally significant in the context of the remaining growth cell areas of the Rototuna Structure Plan, resulting in the need for special landscape management and planning provisions to retain the character while achieving a form and density of the development that enables a sense of the underlying landform to be retained.

​Objective Policies​
5.2.2
Residential development produces good on-site amenity.
​ ​ ​ ​
5.2.2a
Residential design achieves quali​​ty on-site amenity by providing:

i. Private, useable outdoor living areas.

ii. Access to sunlight and daylight throughout the year.

iii. Adequate storage space and service areas to accommodate typical residential living requirements.

iv. Insulation to avoid or mitigate adverse noise effects.

v. Parking and manoeuvring areas on-site to meet the needs and convenience of residents.

vi. Energy-efficient and sustainable design characteristics and technologies where compatible with the scale and form of residential development.​

5.2.2b
Residential sites adjacent to public space should achieve visual and physical connectivity to these areas. ​
5.2.2c
Building design and location should protect the privacy of adjoining sites. ​
5.2.2d
Buildings should be designed to conform to natural topography.​

Explanation

Good design of housing is critically important to on-site and off-site amenity. The policies identify the features important for each residential unit, regardless of what form the dwelling may take. Important design features include access to sunlight, outdoor living space, storage space, visual connectivity to public spaces such as the street, privacy, and off-road parking. Incorporation of these features will ensure functional and high-quality living environments for the occupants.

Special Residential Zone

​Objective Policies​
5.2.3
Recognise, protect and, where possible, enhance the values of the identified Special Residential Zone.
​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​
5.2.3a
Development is consis​​tent with the generally low intensity and low-density residential character of the area through:
i. Providing front and side yard setbacks.

ii. Providing a low level of site coverage.

iii. Being consistent with the existing dwelling densities.​
5.2.3b
Development should retain a strong visual relationship to the streetscape through:
i. Ensuring any front yard fencing enables visibility with the streetscape.

ii. Orienting buildings to overlook the street.

iii. Ensuring the design of buildings avoids creating blank facades facing public spaces.​
5.2.3c
Mature trees and other vegetation should be retained, particularly in the front yard.​
5.2.3d
The local context, scale and character are retained.​
5.2.3e
Existing valued character elements shall be protected and enhanced by:
i. Retaining pre-1940 dwellings within the dwelling control area.

ii. Retaining pre-1939 dwellings within the Claudelands West area.

iii. Ensuring alterations or additions to the streetscape façade of pre-1940 dwellings in the dwelling control area do not adversely affect the special character of the area.​
5.2.3f
New buildings and structures are compatible with the form, height and bulk of houses constructed before 1939 in Claudelands West.​
5.2.3g
Non-residential activities should not establish in any Special Residential Zone unless potential adverse effects are less than minor. ​
5.2.3h
Buildings are located only within the front yard setback where other sitings are proven to be impracticable. Buildings located within the front yard setback shall provide mitigation by provision of planting and screening and minimising the prominence of the building in relation to the main dwelling when viewed from the transport corridor.​

Explanation

These policies identify the important elements that lend the Special Residential Zone its uniqueness.

Special Heritage Zone

 
​Objective Policies​
5.2.4
Recognise, protect and, where, possible enhance the heritage values of the identified Special Heritage Zone.
​ ​ ​ ​
5.2.4a
Development should:

i. Maintain the predominately low-intensity and density characteristics of the area.

ii. Be compatible with the site layout​, site size and dimensions, building form, height, design, materials, scale and other heritage values of the area.

iii. Ensure that original buildings and structures are retained on the site.

iv. Provide landscaping in keeping with local residential amenity.

v. Avoid any significant adverse effects on the heritage values of the Special Heritage Zone.

vi. Encourage the protection and ongoing maintenance of the Special Heritage Zone.

vii. Avoid any significant adverse effects on the streetscape appearance of the area.

viii. Avoid removal of any significant vegetation in the Special Heritage Zone.

ix. Reflect the characteristic separation of original dwellings including their open aspect to the streetscape.

x. Ensure that any car parking, servicing, lighting and sign requirements do not adversely affect the heritage character of the area or the relationship of a building with the streetscape.

xi. Ensure that the front and side elevations (including roofs) of new buildings and structures are consistent with the design, fenestration, materials and finishes of neighbouring original dwellings.​

5.2.4b
Within the Frankton Railway Village, buildings should be single storey with a low-pitched gable roof.​
5.2.4c
The demolition or removal of a building is allowed only where it has been demonstrated to be the only practicable option.​
5.2.4d
Non-residential activities should not establish in any Special Heritage Zone unless potential adverse effects are less than minor. ​
 

Explanation

These policies identify the important elements that lend the Special Heritage Zone its uniqueness. A specific policy is identified for the Frankton Railway Village.

Special Natural Zone

​Objective Policies​
5.2.5
Create a distinctive residential environment that recognises, protects and enhances water quality, ecological, natural, cultural, landscape and recreational values.
​ ​
5.2.5a
Subdivision and development should:
i. Protect and enhance ecological connections to Lake Waiwhakareke as part of improving its ecological functioning and resilience. 

ii. Maximise visual and phy​sical connections with Lake Waiwhakareke and the Waiwhakareke Natural Heritage Park, including long-distance views of the park from public spaces on the ridgelines.

iii. Encourage planting schemes that complement the Natural Heritage Park in the Lake Waiwhakareke Landscape Character Area.

iv. Encourage safety and surveillance of public spaces, including the street, through:

  • Ensuring the form and design of fencing sharing a boundary with public spaces does not obstruct visibility.
  • Orienting buildings to overlook public spaces.

v. Ensure that development contributes to the retention and enhancement of the ridgelines and upper hill slopes as legible features of the Rotokauri skyline.

vi. Maximise the public amenity value of existing ridgeline roads to provide viewing opportunities of the City and surrounding rural landscape.

vii. Be consistent with the Rotokauri Structure Plan.

viii. Be consistent with the Lake Waiwhakareke Landscape Character Area Design Guide.​

ix.  Ensure that development avoids any adverse effects on the water quality or ecological values of Lake Waiwhakareke. 

5.2.5b
Non-residential activities should not establish in any Special Natural Zone unless potential adverse effects are less than minor. ​
5.2.5c
Development of Lot 2 DP425316 shall provide a park edge transport corridor that acts as transitional space on the interface of the Special Natural and Open Space Zones.
 

Explanation

The Lake Waiwhakareke Landscape Character Area and Rotokauri Ridgeline Area are unique in that they are greenfield areas with special natural landscape characteristics. It is important the new development in these areas recognises the natural values and enhances them. These areas are also in close proximity to Lake Waiwhakareke a Significant Natural Area and development in the surrounding area needs to ensure that adverse effects on water quality and ecological values of the Lake are avoided.  

The proximity of Lot 2 DP425316 to Lake Waiwhakareke and the Waiwhakareke Heritage Park requires development to respond to the character of the Park. The inclusion of a park edge transport corridor is crucial to ensuring the amenity of the Waiwhakareke Heritage Park is maintained and an appropriate transition occurs between the built environment and the open space zone.

Temple View Zone

​Objective Policies​
5.2.6
To ensure that development within the Temple View Heritage Area maintains and enhances the special heritage characteristics of the area.​
​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​
5.2.6a
The continued use of the Heritage Area as a focus for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day​ Saints is provided for.​
5.2.6b
Development within the Heritage Area is sensitive in terms of scale, form and design with the existing heritage characteristics of the area.​
5.2.6c
Fragmentation through subdivision is prevented.​
5.2.6d
Development should ensure that the siting and design of new buildings and structures are sensitive to the setting and significance of the Temple as a spiritual and physical landmark.​
5.2.6e
The maintenance and repair of buildings, curtilage wall, landscapes, roads, tracks and car parking areas should have regard to the distinctive character of the precinct and the pre-eminence of the Temple building.​
5.2.6f
Additions and alterations to buildings and curtilage wall should be consistent with the character of the precinct and the pre-eminence of the Temple building.​
5.2.6g
Demolition should not adversely impact on the landscape significance of the Temple.​
5.2.6h
Works that would adversely affect the strong relationship between the Temple, Visitor Centre and Temple President’s house are avoided.​
5.2.6i
Re-contouring or modification of the landscape recognises the high visibility and prominence of the Temple and provides for the management of effects on archaeological deposits or features.​
5.2.6j
The landscape characteristics and qualities of the Heritage Area are retained, including open and structured spaces, in particular the formal front entry staircases, lawns, walls and planting boxes.​
 

Explanation

The policies aim to enable the ongoing use of the Temple View Heritage Area by the Church or other organisations for a wide range of activities, subject to controls that ensure that the overall coherence and integrity of the area, the pre-eminence of the Temple itself and the key characteristic elements of the area are properly recognised and provided for. As a building in active use for religious purposes, it is recognised that proposals may be made for the erection of religious symbolism and effigies in the future, in addition to works needed to ensure compliance with building design standards and the functionality and appearance of the Temple.

​Objective Policies​
5.2.7
To ensure development within the Temple View Character Area maintains and enhances its special character.​
​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​
5.2.7a
Development maintains the character, appearance and relationship to Tuhikaramea Road and the Temple View Village.​
5.2.7b
The design of new buildings and structures in terms of their height, materials, scale and form is in keeping with the scale and character of the area.​
5.2.7c
New buildings and structures within the former teacher housing corridor are located to retain the existing set back from Tuhikaramea Road established by the First House.​
5.2.7d
New buildings and structures are located to retain generally consistent spatial character along the Tuhikaramea road corridor.​
5.2.7e
New structures, such as fences and walls, within the setback of the former teacher housing corridor fronting Tuhikaramea Road are consistent with the original colour and materials used throughout the Character Area.​
5.2.7f
The existing low brick walls in the front yard of houses fronting Tuhikaramea Road are retained or rebuilt as required.​
5.2.7g
Additions, alterations and renovations of buildings within the former teacher housing corridor are implemented in a sensitive and sympathetic manner that retains the form and style of existing buildings and the appearance of the streetscape.​
5.2.7h
Works that may affect the treatment of open spaces and boundaries are managed.​
5.2.7i
The heritage buildings in Volume 2, Appendix 8, Schedule 8A: Built Heritage are used and developed in a manner that maintains their distinctive heritage values.​
 

Explanation

A significant characteristic of the corridor along Tuhikaramea Road is based on the subservient and simple architectural style of the early missionary houses, that were used as teacher housing. These buildings were set within an open, campus-style landscape. The corridor forms an important gateway to the New Zealand Temple of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and the adjoining former Church College Campus.

The style of the houses along Tuhikaramea Road and separation distances between them was similar, giving consistency in form. The uniformity in scale and space was reinforced by the extensive use of the standardised cream-coloured brickwork throughout Temple View and the low cement brick wall, which enclosed the front yards of the houses on both sides of Tuhikaramea Road. In providing for future use and development of the former Church College campus and the teacher housing corridor, it is important to recognise the significant contribution that these characteristics made to the diversity and appeal of the City’s built environment. Although the school has closed, the Church College campus and former teacher houses provide an opportunity to open a new chapter in the development of the local community and its environment.​

Peacocke Character Zone

 
​Objective Policies​
5.2.8
To ensure urban development within the Peacocke Character Zone delivers high levels of residential amenity, respects and restores the area's natural environment, and is sustainably integrated with the city as a whole.​
​ ​ ​
5.2.8a
Ensure through master planning that urban development is not compromised through inappropriate land use activities.​
5.2.8b
Ensure the appropriate nature, scale and intensity of urban development is undertaken in an efficient and coordinated manner in order that integrated and efficient development occurs within and between the neighbourhoods and the City as a whole.​
5.2.8c
Ensure that development is consistent with the Peacocke Structure Plan and any master plan prepared for the area.​
5.2.8d
Ensure that development of non-​​residential activities are located in areas identified in the Peacocke Structure Plan or any approved master plan that provides for such activities.​
 

Explanation

The character to be established is a high quality urban environment that is based on the urban design principles outlined in the Peacocke Structure Plan and which recognises a number of specific natural character elements. A master plan approach has been developed to achieve this by ensuring that infrastructure provisions and staging are integrated with development while enabling flexibility and innovation in design.

Urban development within the Peacocke Character Zone is limited until the necessary bulk trunk infrastructure and transport networks have been established to join Peacocke to the City’s existing infrastructure network. It is limited by the capacity of existing infrastructure.

Rototuna North East Character Zone

​ObjectivePolicies​
5.2.9
To recognise the local significance of the Rototuna ridgeline as a landscape feature and ensure that the form and pattern of residential development in the northeastern area (Rototuna North East Character Zone) of the Rototuna Structure Plan helps retain this underlying landform and is not incompatible with the future operation of the Waikato Expressway or the City’s infrastructure.
Maintain the public amenity value of existing ridgeline roads and the identified viewing points shown on the structure plan within the open space area as viewing opportunities of the City and surrounding rural landscape.
5.2.9b
Ensure development does not constrain the development, construction or operation of the future Waikato Expressway (Designation E90).
5.2.9c
Ensure development does not constrain the operation of the City’s infrastructure.
5.2.9d
Provide a maximum development yield and minimum average lot size to ensure the character of the natural topography of the area is maintained and the sustainable use of the City’s land resource is promoted while mitigating against the effects from the development of this area of land on the City’s infrastructure.
​5.2.9e
Promote a connection across the Waikato Expressway designation (Designation E90), such as an underpass, to facilitate walking and cycle network connectivity between the Rototuna North East Character Zone and the remaining Rototuna Structure Plan area.

Explanation

As a landscape feature, the north eastern area of Rototuna is locally significant in the context of the Rototuna growth cell. The mixed nature of the landscape, bounded by Horsham Downs Road (as the boundary edge between Hamilton City and Waikato District Councils) to the north and the Waikato Expressway designation to the south  helps to physically and visually define the area’s character. In particular, the Horsham Downs Road ridgeline is a strong feature that differentiates the urban edge of the Rototuna Growth Cell from the adjoining rural landscape of Waikato District.

This area warrants special landscape management and planning provisions to retain the character of the elevated landscape to achieve a form and density of development that enables a sense of the underlying landform to be retained. The Rototuna North East Character Zone comprises a primary ridgeline that runs from west to east direction. The area also contains a number of inner areas that have lower lying topography.

The zone is made up of a number of key visual and physical characteristics. These are as follows:

• Distinctive pattern of ridges that constitute a coherent and discrete topographic feature of the north eastern part of the Rototuna Growth Cell;
• The differentiation between the elevated hill area from the surrounding lower flat land;
• The role of the primary ridgeline in defining the boundary between the growth cell and the adjoining rural parts of the Waikato District  to the north;
• The role of the ridgelines and hills in defining a series of basins and associated  flats on the lower lying ground and flat plateaus on the elevated areas;
• The visual and physical connection with the rest of the Rototuna Growth Cell, specifically the Rototuna Town Centre Zone and with the City beyond the Waikato Expressway Designation, notwithstanding that the designation to an extent visually separates the Rototuna North East Character Zone from the rest of the Rototuna Growth Cell.

The opportunity exists to promote development that responds positively to the underlying landscape facilitating greater legibility and the creation of a distinctive urban character.

Page reviewed: 10 Sep 2019 1:55pm